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Make it fast or make it slow: Thanksgiving turkey, two ways


   

For those of us who love to cook, there's nothing better than spending an entire Sunday afternoon in the kitchen, simmering sauces and baking cakes.

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But the reality is that those days of long-recipe luxury are few and far between. In Make it Fast or Make it Slow, we're bringing you two versions of the same dish: one that's quick and easy and one that's well, not so quick. Both are worthy of an addition to your repertoire, whether you're feeling ambitious or just hungry.

   

Deep-Fried Turkey
Deep-fried turkey is simpler and quicker to prepare than the traditional oven roasted varieties. However, as with all great turkey recipes, you will have to start your preparation the day before. Our own chef Jeffrey Gardner recommends brining your turkey to keep the meat tender and boost its flavor. A quick one-hour trip in the fryer will cook the bird perfectly and give it crisp crackling skin, making for a centerpiece that will please even the fussiest Thanksgiving guest.
Get the recipe

RELATED: Chefs share tasty recipes using leftover Thanksgiving turkey 

  

Oven-Roasted Turkey
This traditional roasted turkey takes a good bit longer to cook, but it is a labor of love for the host who truly enjoy all parts of holiday cooking. Again, you'll want to start with a brine — a dry brine this time — the day before. When you're ready to roast, fill the turkey cavity with herbs, onions and garlic ‘fixins’ and then let the oven do its thing.

When the meat comes to temperature, its skin will be ultra brown and crisp, and even the white meat will be tender and fragrant.
Get the recipe

This article was originally published at Southern Kitchen, which is owned by Cox Media Group. AJC is also owned by Cox Media Group and may receive a commission for purchases made through some links in this article.


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