You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to myDaytonDailyNews.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and bonus content- exclusively for subscribers. Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks

X

Welcome to myDaytonDailyNews.com

This subscriber-only site gives you exclusive access to breaking news, in-depth coverage, exclusive interactives and bonus content.

You can read free articles of your choice a month that are only available on myDaytonDailyNews.com.

Sandwich and wine for dinner? Yes, please, when they’re this good


Why don’t we make a sandwich our dinner more often? Especially when it’s as good as this poblano and chorizo torta? Congratulate yourself for your good sense with one of these three wines, all picked to stand up to the spicy heat.

——— 

MAKE THIS 

CHORIZO TORTA 

Roast 1 large poblano over a hot grill, turning, until blackened all over. Rub off skin; discard stem and seeds. Chop pepper. Cook 1 pound Mexican chorizo sausage, casing removed, in a large, dry skillet set over medium heat, breaking it up with a wooden spoon, 5 minutes. Add 1 white onion, chopped, and 1/2 teaspoon oregano. Cook until onion has softened and sausage is done, about 5 minutes. Stir in chopped pepper. Divide mixture among 4 Mexican bolillos. Top with shredded Monterey Jack and sharp white cheddar. Squish and crisp sandwiches on a griddle. Makes: 4 servings 

Recipe by Leah Eskin 

DRINK THIS 

Pairings by sommelier Arthur Hon of Sepia, as told to Michael Austin: 

2015 Chateau Pey La Tour Rosé, Bordeaux, France: The two major flavors of this torta come from the poblano pepper and the chorizo sausage, which brings its own brand of spice and heat. To play off of the pepper flavors, here is a rosé with the pepper aromas inherent in some Bordeaux grape varieties. Also, the fresh acidity and natural weight of this rosé will match well with this rustic dish. 

2015 Pinuaga La Senda, Castilla-La Mancha, Spain: La Senda is an unoaked merlot blend with a touch of tempranillo, and like many Spanish wines, it has an affinity for the combination of meat, spices and a little heat. The naturally spiced flavors and fresh, fruity profile of the wine have the right amount of elegance and versatility to work with the direct flavors of this dish. Remember to serve the wine slightly chilled. 

2012 Domaine Dugois Arbois Savagnin Sous Voile, Jura, France: This wine has focused acidity along with a touch of spiced, oxidative notes in the form of cardamom, fenugreek and salted toffee. It’s a versatile wine for food with tricky spice or richer flavors — or food that’s too heavy for a traditional white and too light for red. The wine’s citruslike acidity and notes of dried stone fruits will match nicely with the dish.


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Food & Dining

This Century bartender shares her ideal last meal
This Century bartender shares her ideal last meal

They say “you are what you eat,” and I tend to agree that what you choose to eat says a lot about who you are.  At a dinner party, when everyone’s sated and could not eat another bite, I like to bring up my favorite topic: food. Always more food. When I’m trying to get to know someone new, I always like to find out what...
The single most important ingredient
The single most important ingredient

This article is excerpted from “Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat: Mastering the Elements of Good Cooking” by Samin Nosrat (Simon & Schuster, 2017).; (ART ADV: With photos XNYT43-46.) Growing up, I thought salt belonged in a shaker at the table, and nowhere else. I never added it to food, or saw Maman add it. When my aunt Ziba sprinkled it onto her...
Everything’s up to date (for 1958, that is)
Everything’s up to date (for 1958, that is)

Forget the famous power lunch. For the time being, forget about any lunch at all in the rooms that used to house the Four Seasons. When the Grill, the first of two new restaurants in the Seagram Building space, opens to the public next week, it will serve only dinner. Jeff Zalaznick, a partner in Major Food Group, which now runs the restaurant complex...
Ask the Test Kitchen: Do you peel bananas before freezing?
Ask the Test Kitchen: Do you peel bananas before freezing?

A: If there is one cool thing about bananas, it’s that they freeze wonderfully. And they keep just fine in the freezer for about three months. Freezing is a way to preserve bananas that have reached their ripeness peak or are close to overripe. Rather than tossing them because you can’t eat them out of hand, freeze them to use in making...
How to make a sushi bowl
How to make a sushi bowl

Deconstruction once ruled academia. The literary theory insisted that the text (pre-texting) be taken apart, like some Lego castle, and left in pieces on the classroom floor. The game kept professor and student busy for years. Now new fads roam campus, and deconstruction has moved on to the menu. The enchilada, for instance, no longer dresses for dinner...
More Stories