Recipe: Ambrosia dessert


Southern Recipe Restoration Project 

Ambrosia is a staple of many a Southern holiday table -- often embellished with marshmallows, whipped topping, nuts, maraschino cherries and more. This version, tested by chef Virginia Willis, proves that simple is often best. 

 The contributor: Lore Tarrance and her husband are formerly from Alpharetta, where they were among the first residents of the Windward subdivision. 

The story: Tarrance's husband’s grandmother, Sallie Fannie Rowland, ran a boardinghouse in her home from 1920 to the 1940s, to support her children, including Dorothy Lucia, known as Dot, Tarrance's husband's mother. 

"At holiday gatherings, while Dot was alive, she spoke of her mother and her wonderful cooking. Some of these recipes were passed to me. The ambrosia, simple as it is in ingredients, is definitely a refreshing favorite. It was always served as a dessert after a huge [holiday] meal, when it was peak season for citrus." 

-- As told to Susan Puckett

Hands on time: 10 minutes  Total time: 10 minutes  Serves: 4

    6 oranges, preferably Temple 
    1/2 cup sweetened flaked coconut 
    Granulated sugar, to taste

Using a sharp paring knife, remove ends of orange. Set the oranges on end and remove peel by cutting between the peel and flesh, rotating as peel is removed. Then, working over a medium bowl, slice between membranes to remove segments, allowing juice and segments to fall into bowl. Add coconut and sugar, to taste. Stir to combine. Cover and refrigerate to marinate for 1 to 2 hours. Serve immediately.

This recipe calls for 1 to 2 hours of chilling time.

Per serving: 140 calories (percent of calories from fat, 19), 2 grams protein, 29 grams carbohydrates, 5 grams fiber, 3 grams fat (3 grams saturated), no cholesterol, 24 milligrams sodium. 



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