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Bridge demolition will follow 6 other times structures have been blown up on purpose


The Ohio Department of Transportation plans to implode a half-century-old southbound steel truss section of the of the old Jeremiah Morrow Bridge on Sunday. Part of an old northbound section of the bridge in Warren County was brought down by explosives on May 11, 2014. 

A new concrete bridge replaced the old sections in a six-year, $104 million construction project. The highest bridge in Ohio spans the Little Miami River and carries I-71 traffic between Cincinnati and Columbus. 

Approaches to the bridge area will be blocked from 5 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Ohio 73 and Ohio 48 interchanges, along with closures for the bike path and river below. Detours will be set up. This will require the ramps from Ohio 123 to northbound I-71, east of Lebanon, and from Wilmington Road to southbound I-71, to be closed during the demolition. 

In case of inclement weather, the demolition will be pushed back to Sunday, April 30. 

There will be no public viewing of the event, so check back here for details. 

» RELATED: Implosion of Ohio’s tallest bridge to block Warren County area Sunday 

In the meantime, here are 6 other times explosives have been used to bring down area structures:

Rike’s Building, downtown Dayton 

Nov. 14, 1999 

First came a 20-second string of explosions then a mushrooming cloud of dust floating across downtown when Rike’s Department Store came down. 

The store — actually multiple buildings at Second and Main streets and the heart of down Dayton during the 1950s and 1960s — was brought down by 1,500 pounds of explosives. 

More than 200 loyal customers and former employees had gathered to blow a bittersweet kiss at the building before the implosion. The building came down to make way for the Schuster Performing Arts Center. 

» PHOTOS: Rike's Building imploded to make way for Schuster Center  

Cinergy Field, Cincinnati 

Dec. 29, 2002 

The former Riverfront Stadium went down in smoke and dust in 37 seconds. The Cincinnati Reds moved to the stadium partway through the 1970 season and made the World Series that year, and in four other years there, before it was brought down 32 years later. 

The Cincinnati Bengals also played home games in the venue from 1970-99, earning a trip to the Super Bowl in 1988. 

Nearly 2,000 pounds of explosives with a 60 percent nitroglycerin mix brought down the landmark on the banks of the Ohio River.

Mad River Power Plant smokestack, Springfield 

Nov. 10, 2010 

A nearly 300-foot smokestack brought down by explosives at an old Ohio Edison power plant in Springfield toppled in the wrong direction and sent spectators scrambling before knocking down two 12,000-volt power lines and crashing onto a building housing backup generators. 

No injuries were reported after the 275-foot tower at the unused 83-year-old Mad River Power Plant teetered and then fell in a southeast direction — instead of east, as originally planned — seconds after explosives were detonated. 

The mishap knocked out power to about 4,000 customers and resulted in lawsuit between the power company and demolition contractor. 

» RELATED: Agreement reached in smokestack demolition suit 

Schwind Building, downtown Dayton 

Aug. 17, 2013 

As charges set off 50 pounds of dynamite, the 12-story building at 27 S. Ludlow St. shuddered, twisted, and collapsed nearly straight down. The plan at the time was to make way for a student housing project that has yet to materialize. 

Built in 1913, the building was best known as home to the Moraine Embassy restaurant, a tavern that was long a favorite of public officials, downtown workers and newspaper employees who worked at the Dayton Daily News when the paper was located next door. 

» PHOTOS: From the archives: Implosion of Schwind Building in Dayton 

» RELATED: Blasts drop Schwind Building in cloud of dust 

Jeremiah Morrow Bridge (section of old northbound lanes), Warren County 

May 11, 2014 

A northbound section of the bridge over the Little Miami River was brought down for the I-71 bridge replacement project. 

State Rep. Ron Maag (R-Harlan Twp.) participated by pushing the button to set off the ordnances. The demolition appeared to go as planned, according to video of the event provided by the Ohio Department of Transportation. 

Half of the new structure was completed and opened to traffic on the northbound side in November 2013. 

» RELATED: Part of Jeremiah Morrow Bridge blown up 

» Who was Jeremiah Morrow, namesake of Ohio's highest bridge?

Champion Paper Mill smokestack, Hamilton 

June 24, 2014 

In about 20 seconds, between 150 and 200 pounds of explosives brought down a 180-foot high boiler house and a 220-foot smokestack that had stood for 100 years. 

More than 1,000 Hamilton and Butler County residents watched with mixed emotions as explosions cracked the air and the boiler house fell away from the smokestack, seconds before the stack crumpled in two and toppled.

The Champion Paper Plant was founded as a coating mill in 1894 by Peter G. Thomson, originally buying paper from other Hamilton mills, according to a 1985 Journal-News article. 

» RELATED: Hamilton paper mill’s iconic smokestack demolished 


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