Cyberspace’s most dangerous places put your personal data at risk

Cyberspace’s most dangerous places put your personal data at risk

Like any community, the Internet has dark alleys and sketchy places it is best to avoid. Granted, anyone with a connected mobile device is at risk of having his or her private personal and financial information stolen and misused. But dangerous software and applications often lurk in specific corners of cyberspace, where a touch of a button can have disastrous consequences. RELATED: With one click...
How the bad guys did it: Thousands of Ohioans hacked, up to $35M stolen

How the bad guys did it: Thousands of Ohioans hacked, up to $35M stolen

One errant button click. That’s all it takes for a computer or mobile device to be infected or hacked. Just by getting people to click on malicious e-mail attachments, an international crime ring set in motion a scheme that infected more than 60,000 individual computers, sent out 11 million malicious emails and defrauded people of up to $35 million, according to federal authorities and security...
These passwords will get you hacked

These passwords will get you hacked

123456. Password. Your birthdate. Your nickname. Your phone number. These are just a few examples of the easy-to-crack passcodes and passwords that too many people use to protect their smartphones, mobile devices and online accounts. If you use any of these or other simple words or numerical combinations, you are asking to be hacked. “With your accounts, create complex passwords, not something...
SPECIAL REPORT: Cyber warriors can stop cars, shut off water and unlock jail cells

SPECIAL REPORT: Cyber warriors can stop cars, shut off water and unlock jail cells

Air Force Capt. Eddie Caberto taps a key board and a speedometer flashes beyond 100 mph before redlining. For the student at the Air Force Institute of Technology the demonstration via a laptop computer and a mock-up of a speedometer demonstrates what could happen if a hacker found their way inside your car or truck through a vehicle’s entertainment system. “I would launch an attack from...
Need a job? U.S. military looking for cyber warriors

Need a job? U.S. military looking for cyber warriors

The nation faces a shortage of cyber workers at a time when threats have grown and a silent cyber war must enlist more troops, officials say. “If you look at what’s going on with the cyber workforce there’s a huge shortage,” said Timothy Birt, Riverside Research information technology security administrator in Beavercreek. “And it’s really getting the younger generation...
MAP: 15 cyber attacks you should know about

MAP: 15 cyber attacks you should know about

Cyber hackers could attack the country’s power grids, financial institutions or water treatment plants or access private or confidential information of federal employees.  This newspaper took an in-depth look at the latest cyber threats and the training of cyber warriors at the Air Force Institute of Technology. The map below shows 15 cyber attacks that took place in 2016 that resulted...
The war you can’t see: U.S. cyber warriors protect us from daily attacks

The war you can’t see: U.S. cyber warriors protect us from daily attacks

Cyber warfare could lead to chaos and hackers could potentially attack water treatment and chemical plants, power grids, financial institutions and disable weapon systems, and have stolen personal data of millions of federal employees and consumers. Every hour of every day, cyber warriors silently fight an unrelenting war with millions of daily attacks to battle invading adversaries thousands of miles...
Nurses, doctors climbing ladder to big paychecks

Nurses, doctors climbing ladder to big paychecks

A growing number of hospital leaders can chart their career paths from emergency room bedsides to the boardroom’s of giant hospital systems, which are increasingly promoting managers with medical degree’s in hopes of obtaining better clinical outcomes. In the Dayton area, highly skilled doctors and nurses with management skills hold some of the top leadership positions at local hospitals...
Not just the ‘boys club:’ Local women health executives earn top pay

Not just the ‘boys club:’ Local women health executives earn top pay

Women have made themselves at home in executive positions at the largest hospital systems in the Dayton area, defying the boys-club mentality and societal stereotypes that continue to stymie progress for many of their female counterparts. Despite holding more than three-quarters of all health care jobs, women comprise only about 21 percent of executives and board members at the nation’s Fortune...
Ballooning bonuses boost pay for hospital CEOs

Ballooning bonuses boost pay for hospital CEOs

The Dayton-area hospital executives who took home the largest paychecks in 2015 benefited from incentive-laden contracts that are increasingly based on how well their health systems perform in keeping their patients healthy and out of the hospital. Overall, the 20 highest-paid executives and administrators saw single-digit percent increases in base pay, on average, from 2014 to 2015, based on the...
Search: What do healthcare executives earn?

Search: What do healthcare executives earn?

This media outlet obtained hundreds of pages of public IRS records for local nonprofit hospitals to report on the salaries and incentives awarded to hospital CEOs and executives in calendar year or fiscal year 2015. All nonprofits are required to disclose financial and salary information to the IRS, in exchange for their tax-exempt status. Use the search tool below to find salary and incentives data...
Special Report: Million dollar paychecks for top hospital CEOs

Special Report: Million dollar paychecks for top hospital CEOs

On average, the 20 highest paid hospital executives in the Dayton area take home more than $700,000 in annual salary and incentives, with the Top 5 earning well over $1 million a year, based on the nonprofit hospitals’ most recent tax returns. Fred Manchur, CEO of Dayton-based Kettering Health Network — with eight hospitals and $1.5 billion in annual revenue — topped the list with...
Advice to avoid violence at work: Avoid ‘perp walk’

Advice to avoid violence at work: Avoid ‘perp walk’

While it is impossible to know for sure if someone is carrying a hidden gun, or is intent on committing mayhem with it at work, employment experts say there are things employers can do to minimize the danger from disgruntled employees. For starters, employers should always do a risk assessment when facing the task of disciplining or firing an employee, said Steve Watring, an attorney at Dunlevey,...
9 workplace shooting incidents in Ohio and the U.S.

9 workplace shooting incidents in Ohio and the U.S.

News accounts of workplace shootings by disgruntled employees are fodder for both gun rights advocates and gun control proponents to make their cases. Ohio’s newly expanded Concealed Carry Weapons (CCW) law allows license-holders to bring their handguns onto company property beginning on March 21.  The law overturns gun-free workplace company policies and forbids companies from...
Hundreds killed by guns in workplace

Hundreds killed by guns in workplace

Firearms were the cause of about one-tenth of workplace fatalities in 2015, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The shootings run the gamut from robberies and other crimes, to police officers and security forces killed in the line of duty, to suicides, to disgruntled employees or spouses coming in and killing people. The issue of guns in the workplace is controversial. Some people...
Wright-Patt employees can't bring handguns to work 

Wright-Patt employees can't bring handguns to work 

Workers at the states’s largest single-site employer, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, won’t be allowed to bring their handguns to work even though a new state law says employees with concealed-carry permits can keep their guns in locked cars on company property. “Wright-Patterson AFB is an exclusive federal jurisdiction and therefore CCW holders are not authorized to carry privately...
5 things to know about Ohio’s CCW law

5 things to know about Ohio’s CCW law

Every state and the District of Columbia have some form of concealed-carry (CCW) permits for handguns. Here are 5 things to know about Ohio’s law. 1) It was passed in 2004 and has been modified repeatedly since then. 2) A record-breaking 158,982 new concealed carry licenses and renewals were issued in 2016. 3) Thirty-six states recognize Ohio’s CCW permits under reciprocity agreements...
Do concealed-carry laws make us safer?

Do concealed-carry laws make us safer?

Concealed-carry advocates say laws allowing permit-holders to keep guns close at hand serve as a crime deterrent. Opponents say just the opposite. So which side is right? While there are strong opinions on both sides on that question, definitive data is lacking to prove either point. “The numbers are pretty low in how many of (CCW holders) have actually used their concealed weapon to save themselves...
Starting Tuesday: New law allows handguns on workplace property

Starting Tuesday: New law allows handguns on workplace property

Update 5 a.m.: Beginning March 21, companies in Ohio will no longer be allowed to ban handguns from company property, meaning those who have a state permit to carry a concealed weapon (CCW) can bring their handguns to work as long as the gun is kept locked in their personal car. The law also expands CCW rights in school zones, colleges and universities, child care centers and airport terminals, and...
Bogus receipts, fake expenses: Who’s policing campaign donations?

Bogus receipts, fake expenses: Who’s policing campaign donations?

A Dayton lawmaker’s criminal case illustrates some of the limitations in Ohio watchdogs’ ability to police unethical — and even unlawful — behavior. The way the system works now, public officials are essentially on the honor system. The Ohio Secretary of State’s six auditors spot check the 3,300 to 4,100 campaign finance reports that are filed every year, but they lack...

Do’s and don’t’s about Ohio’s ethics laws: Avoid freebies

Ohio’s Ethics Law, adopted in 1974, covers 590,000 employees, officials, officeholders and public contractors statewide. Here are some very basic Do’s and Don’t’s: Do’s: Ask the Ohio Ethics Commission for advice anytime you have a question. (614-466-7090). Seek out training on the law via online courses offered by the commission. ...
A long history of scandal preceded ethics reform in Ohio

A long history of scandal preceded ethics reform in Ohio

The history of scandal and influence peddling in Ohio politics is long and rich. In May 1911 the New York Times took Ohio politicos to task with the headline: “Wholesale Debauchery of the Ohio Legislature: How the Army of Lobbyists at Columbus Took Over the Business of Making Laws for the State – Wine and Women Employed as Well as Money.” It was another 60 years or so before Ohio...
Few ethics violations result in criminal convictions

Few ethics violations result in criminal convictions

In Ohio, three watchdog agencies are charged with overseeing hundreds of thousands of employees. Those agencies conduct investigations, issue opinions, dole out advice and in rare cases refer criminal activity to local prosecutor’s offices. Ohio taxpayers spend millions of dollars every year on the state’s efforts to ensure that public employees are following state ethics laws. Here are...
Loopholes raise questions about strength of Ohio’s ethics laws

Loopholes raise questions about strength of Ohio’s ethics laws

Trucks no longer back up to government office buildings at Christmas and distribute goodies to lawmakers, as they once did in Ohio, but an investigation by this news organization revealed plenty of loopholes in the state’s system for policing unethical activity by public officials. Lawmakers don’t have to disclose the freebies they receive at certain national conferences, aren’t...
Court records disappear despite ethics convictions

Court records disappear despite ethics convictions

Ohio Legislative Inspector General Tony Bledsoe gives a blank stare when asked which of the hard-fought convictions on ethics violations have been expunged from the court record. Ohio Ethics Commission Director Paul Nick also responds with a poker face. By law, they aren’t allowed to say. It is as though the convictions never happened. But that doesn’t mean they agree with vanquishing...
Special Report: Politicians allowed freebies, favors under Ohio ethics laws

Special Report: Politicians allowed freebies, favors under Ohio ethics laws

The public is in the dark about how much Ohio House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger is paying to rent a 2,200-square-foot luxury condo from a well-heeled GOP donor. Ohio ethics law doesn’t require Rosenberger to offer public proof that he is paying a fair market rate. If you’re curious about what gifts Ohio Gov. John Kasich received in 2015 from Arnold Schwarzenegger, the Golf Channel or Fuyao...
8 Ohio ethics issues, corruption probes you should know about

8 Ohio ethics issues, corruption probes you should know about

Ethics laws in Ohio, which date to the Watergate scandal, exist to hold those in government accountable. All told, Ohio’s law covers 590,000 people, including 10,300 key officials who must file annual financial disclosure statements. An investigation by this news organization -- publishing this week on our website and in print -- found plenty of loopholes in the Ohio law. Here are some notable...
More Stories