Sheriff’s major demoted after ‘inappropriate’ comments


A Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office major who said a corrections officer could “go back to his thug life” was demoted and removed as commander of the Montgomery County Jail division, according to a Wednesday press release.

The demotion of Maj. Scott Landis comes after an internal investigation reported on by this news organization “documented inappropriate and unprofessional comments he made during a meeting involving jail staff,” according to the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office.

Landis’ demotion also was a result of “his unsatisfactory work performance as the commander of the jail division,” the statement said. Landis was demoted from chief deputy to major in January 2013.

The sheriff’s office statement also said Capt. Matt Haines has been promoted to the rank of major and will be assigned as commander of the jail division. The release did not say what rank Landis was demoted to, and no further comment was made available.

Landis was found to have used the terms “thug life,” “Little Hitler” and being “lynched” in an April 20 jail supervisors’ meeting. Landis also did not notify his supervisors of a serious complaint amid allegations that a proper investigation was not done.

A 74-page internal investigation determined that those and other terms were not used in a racially motivated way and that Landis did not place a “bounty” on a corrections officer.

The report signed by Sgt. David Parin determined that allegations of racism were listed as either “unfounded” or that there was “insufficient evidence” to find that Landis further violated professional rules of conduct.

The complaint against Landis was made by Sgt. Eric Banks and corrections officer Jerrid Campbell. During the meeting, Landis showed staff a memo about disparaging things Campbell said about working in the jail.

The complaint states that Landis allegedly said of Campbell, “If he doesn’t want to work here, he can go back to his thug life! I don’t care, but he won’t quit, so I guess I am gonna have to do it for him.”

“His demeanor, and his actions, to me resembled a bully,” Landis told investigators. “And that is what I call a bully.

“The term, that does not have a color to me. That doesn’t have a race, or anything.”

Landis began at the sheriff’s office as a corrections officer assigned to the county jail in 1989. He was promoted to deputy in 1994 and became a detective in 1999, according to the sheriff’s website. Landis was promoted to sergeant in 2005 and major in 2009.

Haines began in law enforcement in 1995 as a reserve deputy with the sheriff’s office and in 1996 worked in Trotwood, according to the sheriff’s website.

After stints as a full-time Trotwood officer and member of the special response team, the Miamisburg High School graduate returned to the sheriff’s office in 2002 as a deputy sheriff.

Haines worked in road patrol, field training, on the hostage negotiation team, was promoted to sergeant, worked as a dispatch supervisor and was promoted to captain in 2002.


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Local

Floridians may qualify for food benefits after Irma
Floridians may qualify for food benefits after Irma

Floridians struggling with the aftereffects of Hurricane Irma could be eligible for help buying food. >> Read more trending news  Officials say households that may not normally be eligible under SNAP rules may qualify for two months of benefits through USDA’s Disaster Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. To be eligible, a family's...
Is diet soda really bad for you? Maybe not
Is diet soda really bad for you? Maybe not

Just how bad is diet soda for you? It may be more complicated than you think. There may be hope for zero-calorie tipplers yet. A spate of recent studies has diet soda lovers fretting over their bubbly beverages. Studies have shown that sucking down diet pop means you may be avoiding sugar and calories but overdosing on chemicals that can be dangerous...
‘Meds-to-beds’ programs aim to prevent re-hospitalization
‘Meds-to-beds’ programs aim to prevent re-hospitalization

As Larry Greer neared the end of a week-long stay at the Washington Hospital Center, he grew anxious. Greer, 57, had suffered a severe leg burn in a hot bath at home in May. Greer has diabetic neuropathy, which reduces feeling in his legs, and he didn’t realize how hot the water was. He received a skin graft at the hospital, where daily doses...
Here’s one marijuana trend you should actually be worried about
Here’s one marijuana trend you should actually be worried about

The latest federal survey data shows that while teen marijuana use continues to decline in the era of legal pot, adult use is rising. The percent of people over the age of 18 who smoke it in a given year has risen from 10.4 percent in 2002 to 14.1 percent in 2016. In other words, 46 million people got high last year. In and of itself, the increase...
Former CDC chief launches $225 million global health initiative
Former CDC chief launches $225 million global health initiative

Tom Frieden, former director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is starting a new initiative to tackle some of global health’s thorniest issues: cardiovascular disease and epidemics. Frieden, a former New York City health commissioner who spent seven years leading the CDC during the Obama administration, said he chose those two...
More Stories