You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to myDaytonDailyNews.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and bonus content- exclusively for subscribers. Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks

X

Welcome to myDaytonDailyNews.com

This subscriber-only site gives you exclusive access to breaking news, in-depth coverage, exclusive interactives and bonus content.

You can read free articles of your choice a month that are only available on myDaytonDailyNews.com.

live video

Updates: Thunderbird F-16 jet flips, crashes at Dayton airport

Graduation requirements may change for Ohio high school juniors

Plan gets approval from the state school board, now it’s up to lawmakers.


The state school board on Tuesday threw its support behind pathways to graduation for Class of 2018 students who don’t pass state tests.

The board backed the recommendations of the state workgroup – to allow those current high school juniors to earn a diploma via a mix of senior-year items like 93 percent attendance, a 2.5 GPA, 120 hours of work/community service or a “capstone project.”

There are eight such markers, and students would have to achieve at least two of them, along with completing – but not passing – the seven state end-of-course exams.

The state legislature would still have to approve these changes, and Sen. Peggy Lehner, chair of the Senate education committee, said there could be small tweaks, but she believes there is general legislative support.

It’s likely that the state legislature will take up the issue during the state budget process now through June.

“I think the recommendations are good. As (state superintendent Paolo) DeMaria said, there’s been very little pushback,” Lehner said.

She said she doesn’t think the recommendation would lower the standards for an Ohio diploma.

“I feel every one of those alternative pathways that they’ve provided are still within the parameters of what we already were doing, are reflective of a certain level of diligence,” Lehner said. “For example, 93 percent attendance. A student who’s in their seat 93 percent of the time is going to be learning.”

RELATED: Workgroup proposes options for diploma

The changes were first suggested after many school superintendents said Ohio’s 2018 graduation rate may drop significantly from its current 83 percent mark, because not enough students will earn the 18 points required on Ohio’s seven new, harder tests.

State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria again presented data Tuesday suggesting that the percentage of Class of 2018 students who were on track to graduate through two years of high school was roughly the same as in past years. That led to brief debate on whether the long-discussed changes are needed, as state board member Kara Morgan questioned that data.

Lehner argued that there is a key difference in the new subject-specific tests, making it less likely that students will score significantly better when they retake the tests months or a year after they finish the coursework.

RELATED: State debate over graduation standards

DeMaria talked about trusting the voice of superintendents who had raised the issue as a major concern, emphasizing that it was only a one-year fix. State board member Pat Bruns argued that accommodations should be made for current high school juniors who have been through multiple changes in testing systems.

Chad Aldis of the Fordham Foundation, a charter school sponsor, was the only member of the public to speak. He said the ability to graduate without any test score proof of knowledge would be a step backward, and would kill the current incentive of students and schools to work harder to meet a higher bar.

Follow Jeremy Kelley DDN for updates on Facebook and Twitter.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Local

Carlisle hires former deputy Greene County treasurer
Carlisle hires former deputy Greene County treasurer

Carlisle’s new finance director started today after working in county government. Ryan Rushing left the Greene County’s Treasurer’s Office where he was hired last September. He will succeed Julie Duffy who became village manager on March 31. MORE: 42 people apply for Carlisle village manager post Rushing worked in the delinquent taxes...
Dayton businesswoman lands on national radio show
Dayton businesswoman lands on national radio show

A Dayton business woman was spotlighted Friday on a nationally syndicated radio show.  Shawon Brown-Gullette, the owner of Dayton Trichology Hair Loss Control Center and Infinitee Salon & Spa, appeared on the Tom Joyner Morning Show to talk about her involvement with Pantene Gold Series. Tom Joyner airs weekday mornings on 92.1 WROU...
Thunderbird crash at the Dayton Air Show: What we know now
Thunderbird crash at the Dayton Air Show: What we know now

Early this afternoon, a military plane crashed at the Dayton Air Show at the Dayton International Airport.  Here is what we know:  The plane. An F-16 Thunderbird was flipped on its top when a strong gust of wind hit the plane after it landed. The plane was taxiing to a staging area before it ended up in the grass.  Bad weather. Radar...
Where are panhandlers the biggest problem in Dayton? We have a map
Where are panhandlers the biggest problem in Dayton? We have a map

People have called police more than 200 times to complain about nuisance panhandlers at two Dayton intersections. These calls resulted in only 10 arrests, citations or any report being filed. Since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 2015 that holding a sign asking for money is free speech (so the city can’t require panhandlers to register) police...
Delays reported at Dayton airport after weather, military accident
Delays reported at Dayton airport after weather, military accident

Delays have been reported at Dayton International Airport, where severe weather is striking and a military plane has crashed during Dayton Air Show practice. Flights have already been delayed or cancelled in and out of the Dayton International Airport. Four morning flights to Chicago, Newark and Charlotte were cancelled, while several other flights...
More Stories