breaking news

10 sailors missing after USS John S. McCain collides with tanker

Opponents walk out of testy town hall with local congressman

Congressman Warren Davidson is talking about health care, Syria and other topics at Troy town hall


Protesters disrupted a town hall meeting with Congressman Warren Davidson, R-Troy, in Troy  Tuesday night. The group eventually was forced to leave the event where the congressman was talking about issues such as health care, Syria and Russia.

The private event was hosted by Miami County Liberty, a conservative group.

Opponents walked out of the event after about an hour when they were told to leave for being disruptive.

The group chanted “we are the people” as they left the event held at the Concord Room.

About 250 people attended the town hall, the majority appearing to be Davidson and GOP supporters. 

Some cheered when a group of vocal protestors were asked to be quiet or leave, but most listened intently as the Congressman answered questions on everything from Russian involvement in the election to environmental policy, education and defense spending. 

Many wore Trump stickers that were handed out at the door. 

Scott Trostel, of Miami County, said he just really wants to hear what his representative has to say because he didn't know much about Davidson when he was running. 

"I think he's got his head on straight," Trostel said after the town hall wrapped up. 

Charlie James, of Greenville, also came to hear what Davidson had to say on the issues, but left with a different take. 

"He's playing by the GOP playbook," said James, who calls himself anti-political party. He felt Davidson was running for re-election rather than actually looking out for the people. 

Davidson spent a fair amount of time explaining his stance on the Republican plan to repeal and replace Obamacare. 

"We have to have reform, that at the end of the day... We at least have to know we are going to taken down premiums," Davidson said. He feels the bill has improved since the day It was pulled before a vote. "People will be surprised but, Republicans don't support just abandoning people," he said. 

He repeatedly used the analogy of more expensive cell phone plans being forced on consumers to describe Obamacare, which prompted a shout from one opponent, "cell phones are not health insurance." 

On foreign policy, the former ranger said the country needs new direction and there needs to be a focus on defeating ISIS. 

When asked about the opioid crisis, Davidson said it's a serious problem and one that's being attacked both federally and locally on a bi-partisan basis. He said the border needs to be secured because it will cut off the supply of heroin coming into the country. He also questioned why cities being hit hard by drug use would advertise being sanctuary cities, because it invites drug dealers. 

When asked about whether he supports subsidizing oil companies, Davidson declared himself a fan of the free market. 

"I don't support subsidizing oil companies, I don't support subsidizing solar panels," he said. He doesn't think the government should "play favorites" with any industry. 

He got a large boo from opponents when he declared that he is happy with President Trump's appointment to the head of the EPA. That outburst eventually led to the majority of opponents walking out and chanting outside the venue.

Some protesters attended from the Indivisible Springfield group.

At least two people ad been removed from the room earlier.

“Answer the question about education,” one of them said.

Davidson took questions from the audience, but they had to be written down. Many appear to have been submitted by opponents who are in the audience.

The group hosting the event laid down some ground rules before the event in an effort to keep order. 

Davidson, who replaced former Speaker John Boehner in the 8th District, represents Butler, Miami, Clark, Darke, Preble and part of Mercer counties..

RELATED: Democrats providing anger at town halls

RELATED: Republicans who won after rowdy town halls now avoiding them

RELATED: Chaffetz faces harsh criticism during packed town hall



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Local

1979 solar eclipse news report ended with wish for peace in 2017
1979 solar eclipse news report ended with wish for peace in 2017

“May the shadow of the moon fall on a world at peace.” Those were the words of ABC News anchorman Frank Reynolds, who covered the last total eclipse that passed over the continental United States on Feb. 21, 1979. Reynolds ended his broadcast with a hopeful message of world peace in 2017 when the next total eclipse passed over the country...
Eclipse also has relevance for astrologers
Eclipse also has relevance for astrologers

Monday’s total eclipse is a significant event for astronomers, but it also has relevance for astrologers.  On her website, astrologer Marjorie Orr said that several major history-altering events -- including the explosion of the first atomic bomb and the assassination of President John F. Kennedy -- have occurred within a few months...
Eastern Tennessee town prepares for ‘sweetest view’ of eclipse
Eastern Tennessee town prepares for ‘sweetest view’ of eclipse

The east Tennessee town of Sweetwater is normally quiet, with the Lost Sea Adventure caverns its main tourist attraction. On Monday, the town will be bustling with thousands of people ready to view the total eclipse that will be passing through the area. City recorder Jessica Morgan said nearly 50,000 to 60,000 people are expected in town to see...
Funkadelic legend George Clinton visits Dayton Funk Museum
Funkadelic legend George Clinton visits Dayton Funk Museum

He wasn’t wearing his signature funkadelic wig, but George Clinton brought his big presence to Dayton on Sunday. The Rock and Roll hall of famer visited the Funk Music Hall of Fame & Exhibition Center at 113 E. Third St. in downtown Dayton’s Fire Block District on Sunday. Clinton, who has been involved with some of the heaviest hitters...
Group from Latvia travels to Idaho for eclipse
Group from Latvia travels to Idaho for eclipse

A group from Latvia will be among the thousands who will view Monday’s total eclipse, the Idaho Statesman reported. Agnese Zalcmane organized a trip for 22 Latvians, who traveled more than 5,000 miles to Weiser, Idaho, this weekend. Zalcmane has seen seven total eclipses in places including Kazakhstan, Australia, Kenya and Indonesia, the...
More Stories