Locally owned pizza chain now wants to be everything to everyone


Rapid Fired Pizza — the fast-growing Kettering-based restaurant chain that appears to have already fended off one competitor with a similar quick-service concept — is expanding its offerings and services to attract more customers and keep them coming back.

>> MORE: Your guide to the best pizza in Dayton

The latest move came this week when Rapid Fired announced it was adding a larger 14-inch pizza-crust option to a menu that had been built on more individual-sized 11-inch thin or 9-inch pan pizza options.

Dayton’s ‘Best Dive Bar’ is having some insane food and drink specials this week

In recent months, Rapid Fired also has launched delivery service to many of its existing restaurants, and the Xenia store that opened last month was the first to offer delivery from day one — “a first for the brand,” Rapid Fired co-founder Kelly Gray said.

ALSO NEW: ‘Famous for Pizza:’ Casey’s General Store planned for Huber Heights

Ray Wiley, Rapid Fired’s co-founder who also launched the Hot Head Burritos brand, said adding the larger pizza option made sense.

RELATED: Pizza wars poised to re-ignite with ‘fast-casual’ chains eyeing SW Ohio

“We had a significant demand for a larger pizza from families,” Wiley told this news outlet. “And with the launch of delivery, a larger pizza seemed to be a logical addition.”

RELATED: New Rapid Fired Pizza restaurant now open in Xenia

The larger pizzas are available in both thin and pan-crust options that can be customized from eight sauces, eight cheeses, more than 30 toppings, and 14 dipping sauces.

RELATED: PizzaFire restaurant closure ‘is permanent,’ realtor says

Rapid Fired restaurants also had gotten many requests from customers for delivery, the chain’s co-fonder said.

Centerville restaurant that shut down Monday may be reborn

“We saw that as much as 50 percent of our business was carry-out, so we added delivery,” Wiley said. Our goal is to be ‘Everything-in-Pizza.’”

RELATED: Rapid Fired Pizza to open 44 new locations in Texas (July 2017)

Rapid Fired also is offering a “NO-DOH” pizza — esssentially a pizza without a crust — designed to address low-carb, low-cal and gluten-free demand. Wiley said the offering has generated an enthusiastic response.

RELATEDQuick-serve pizza chains battle over Dayton market

The first Rapid Fired Pizza opened in September 2015 on Ohio 725 east of the Dayton Mall. The chain now has 22 stores open in two states and many more under construction. The chain has entered into agreements with developers that could lead to as many as 200 or more new locations in Kentucky, Indiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas and California.

RELATED: Dayton-area company to open 60 restaurants in California (July 2017)

Rapid Fired was the first fast-casual, quick-serve pizza concept to open in the Dayton area, but two other chains followed suit: MOD Pizza, which operates restaurants in Englewood and Centerville, and PizzaFire, which shut down its only Dayton-area location in Kettering in early January after about 16 months.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Local

Queen Elizabeth surrounded by fashion royalty at her first London runway show
Queen Elizabeth surrounded by fashion royalty at her first London runway show

This year’s London Fashion Week ended with the biggest name in fashion meeting the biggest name in London. >> Read more trending news  Queen Elizabeth II made quite the splash Tuesday as she sat next to Vogue’s infamous editor-in-chief Anna Wintour in the queen’s historic appearance at a fashion show. Her Majesty came dressed...
‘Black Panther’ raking in the dough, here’s the records the blockbuster has smashed
‘Black Panther’ raking in the dough, here’s the records the blockbuster has smashed

“Black Panther” has taken theaters by storm, breaking box office goals.  >> Read more trending news  Over the Presidents Day weekend, the Marvel flick made a whopping $242 million, much more than the $150 million predicted.  That wasn’t the only success the film saw. It also made history for Marvel,...
Dayton residents, leaders urge DPS board not to close schools
Dayton residents, leaders urge DPS board not to close schools

Residents, union officials and community leaders spoke out at Dayton’s school board meeting Tuesday night, telling the board that they oppose any plan to close schools, just hours after the task force studying that issue wrapped up its last formal meeting. Brian “Mr. U” Urquhart, a retired DPS teacher and coach who still subs in the...
Beavercreek student arrested for threatening messages related to Florida shooting
Beavercreek student arrested for threatening messages related to Florida shooting

A Beavercreek High School student was arrested after reportedly making posts on social media about gun violence and the school shooting incident in Parkland, Florida that left 17 dead. The student was placed in Greene County Juvenile Detention February 17, Beavercreek Police Department said. The student was also linked to an animated video depicting...
In its day, Dayton’s Union Station was a “handsome palace”
In its day, Dayton’s Union Station was a “handsome palace”

Dayton’s Union Station was the majestic and bustling train hub of the city for decades. Described as a “handsome palace” when the train station opened at Sixth and Ludlow Streets in 1900, it was crowned by a seven-story clock tower. The new “Tower Depot” replaced an earlier round-topped depot built in the mid-1850s. Dayton...
More Stories