Longtime Fairfield Twp. fiscal officer Nancy Bock dies at age 60


Fairfield Twp. trustees will meet Friday to appoint a deputy fiscal officer after the death Wednesday of Nancy Bock, who served 18 years as the township’s fiscal officer.

The news of Bock’s death, of which the cause has not yet been released, was delivered Wednesday by Fairfield Twp. Trustee President Susan Berding at the start of a zoning public hearing.

The meeting was on a zoning change request to allow a 174-home subdivision. It was continued until Dec. 14 after the news of Bock’s death.

MORE: Butler County wants 20 major drug companies to pay $5 million

“Mrs. Bock was a wife, mother and grandmother,” Berding said. “Nancy was well-respected and an asset to our township operation.”

Bock, 60, was re-elected in 2015 to her current four-year term.

Trustees adjourned Wednesday evening to executive session to discuss the need to fill Bock’s elected seat.

State law requires trustees to appoint a deputy fiscal officer, and that person “shall serve during the period of time the fiscal officer is absent or incapacitated, or until a successor fiscal officer is elected and qualified.”

The Fairfield Twp. fiscal officer seat is next up for election in November 2019.

MORE: Fairfield schools use No Shave November to fund ‘Superbubz’ playground

“Nancy Bock was a good friend,”Fairfield Twp. Trustee Shannon Hartkemeyer said. “She served many, many years with Fairfield Twp., and selflessly giving of herself and most of her time for the betterment of the township.”

Trustee Joe McAbee said he knew Bock “many, many years” and served with her on the Parents and Teachers for Children organization at Fairfield North Elementary. He said he encouraged Bock to apply for a part-time position in the township’s clerks office. Former trustees Mark Sutton and Steve Morgan, both who each served 16 years together on the board, were on the board with McAbee when they hired Bock.

Sutton said Bock was “a confidant.” He recalls their conversations, where they would sit and talk at length about family or township business.

“She was one of the sweetest people I think I ever met,” Sutton said. “She was just very passionate about what she did and the only way I could describe her is she was a very nice person.”

MORE: Butler County’s Liberty Twp. makes bid for Amazon headquarters

Morgan said Bock “was a saint to me.”

“You couldn’t find a better person … she was a friend,” he said.

Morgan recalls how Bock was honest with her opinions, even if she disagreed.

“She was never mean, never hateful to me,” he said. “If you called and asked her for an opinion, that’s what she’d give you — an honest opinion.”

And while the elected office will be filled, Morgan said, “We can never replace Nancy Bock in Fairfield Twp. We lost a great asset in that clerks office. She took pride in that job.”

to appoint a deputy fiscal officer.

Bock is survived by her husband, Doug, and her three children and grandchildren. Funeral arrangements have not yet been announced.




Next Up in Local

Anger over effort to free convicted killer: ‘He beat my sons to death’
Anger over effort to free convicted killer: ‘He beat my sons to death’

Even after 32 years, the trauma of finding her mother, sister, niece and two young sons slaughtered and three more children left for dead never leaves Tia Talbott. “I just keep wishing it wasn’t real — that it was a dream or bad nightmare and I would wake up and this is all not real,” she said. Talbott is having to relive it...
How Dayton changed the Bombecks — and how the Bombecks changed Dayton
How Dayton changed the Bombecks — and how the Bombecks changed Dayton

Growing up in Dayton left an indelible imprint on Bill and Erma Bombeck – and they, in turn, now leave an enduring legacy in their hometown. Bill Bombeck died Jan. 12 in Phoenix, Ariz., and he soon will be buried alongside his wife in Dayton’s historic Woodland Cemetery. But the couple will live on in the hearts of many friends in the Dayton...
Drug crisis in Ohio: What solutions are making a difference?
Drug crisis in Ohio: What solutions are making a difference?

During a year of record deaths from drug overdoses in Springfield and across Ohio, glimmers of hope also exist as organizations and local governments have begun to find solutions that might make a difference. More than 30 news organizations statewide have partnered to share those solutions and help communities think about which ones might be adaptable...
Drug crisis in Ohio: What solutions are making a difference?
Drug crisis in Ohio: What solutions are making a difference?

During a year of record deaths from drug overdoses in the Miami Valley and across Ohio, glimmers of hope also exist as organizations and local governments have begun to find solutions that might make a difference. More than 30 news organizations statewide have partnered to share those solutions and help communities think about which ones might be adaptable...
John Legend blames Trump for government shutdown, calls him racist
John Legend blames Trump for government shutdown, calls him racist

Grammy and Oscar-winning singer John Legend is claiming that President Donald Trump and his team’s alleged racism are behind the government shutdown. Legend, who has vocally criticized Trump Sr. and Jr. both in the past, tweeted the following just after midnight Saturday: “The reason the government shutdown is that Trump...
More Stories