Moraine touts economic stability, more jobs in new city manager search


The city is touting enhanced fiscal stability as Moraine searches for a new top administrator for the first time in 17 years.

Moraine’s growing income tax revenues, an increase in capital improvement spending and growing general fund reserves are all high marks noted in its job posting to replace longtime City Manager David Hicks.

The city’s 2014 0.5 percent temporary income hike, “along with continued growth of Moraine businesses and regional economic recovery improvements, has led to significant growth in the city’s financial numbers and cash flows,” according to the posting.

RELATED: Search is on for next Moraine city manager

“Income tax revenue for 2016 topped the previous year by 18 percent and exceeded $18 million in annual receipts, the highest amount seen since 2007,” it stated.

The city also highlights the success in having Fuyao Glass America Inc. moving about 2,000 jobs into the site formerly vacated by General Motors, which created an employment void by its 2008 closing.

“The city is fiscally sound and business-friendly with room for future development and has one of the largest automotive glass manufacturers in the U.S. headquartered there,” Moraine records state.

Hicks is likely departing next month from a job he accepted in 2001 after serving more than 25 years in the Moraine Police Division, including being police chief.

RELATED: Retiring city manager called ‘stabilizing leader’

Moraine City Council met twice late last year in executive session to discuss replacing Hicks, records show. In November, council hired the Novak Consulting Group Inc. of Cincinnati for $22,900 to be a consultant in the search.

The deadline for applications is Feb. 9, documents state. But that is a “target date and applications will be accepted after that date and until the position is filled,” according Moraine Assistant Law Director Mary Lentz.

She indicated interviews will begin at the end this month. The new city manager will earn a salary ranging from $120,000 to $150,000, records show.



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