Here's what Ivanka Trump had to say about her father's 2005 comments about women


Ivanka Trump is finally speaking out about the recently unearthed videotape of her father, Donald Trump, making lewd comments about women.

In a statement to Fast Company, Ivanka said her father’s comments were “clearly inappropriate and offensive” and she’s “glad that he acknowledged this fact with an immediate apology to my family and the American people.”

>> 'They're asking for it': Melania Trump calls Bill Clinton's past fair game

Ivanka had been the focus of a series of interviews with the business magazine since the summer. Fast Company profiled how Ivanka manages her brand while navigating the political stage.

“I learned a long time ago that I can’t control the opinions of others or what they project on me. All I can do is live my life, and I’ve tried to do that,” Ivanka told the publication.

>> Melania Trump defends husband's lewd comments about women as 'boy talk'

Ivanka said she expected some negative press during the campaign.

“I mean, it’s been a year and a half of enormous scrutiny, of my family, every business, every movement, action,” she said. “But I think that, you know, that sort of comes with the territory. And I think I’ve probably learned a lot through it and I’ve probably grown a bit tougher in terms of my resilience toward what is thrown our way because, you know, I’ve read some very negative stuff."

>> PHOTOS: Ivanka Trump through the years

Ivanka has not often spoken out about her father’s shortcomings. She told CBS in May that her father has “total respect” for women and the he’s “not a groper” in response to claims made in a scathing New York Times report that the GOP nominee is a sexist who mistreats women.

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In that interview, she denied claims that her father frequently commented on women’s bodies.

Read more here.


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