REPORT:

Springboro drug distributor benefited from weakened drug enforcement

Can Donald Trump turn Bill Clinton into a ‘Bill Cosby’?


Can this campaign get any weirder?

Sensing nothing left to lose, Republican hopeful Donald Trump’s campaign is going for broke with a scorched-earth strategy, intended to make a “Bill Cosby” out of Bill Clinton.

Just as Cosby went from national hero to national pariah after a parade of women charged him with decades of sexually predatory acts, Team Trump hopes to do the same to the former president.

Yes, I know, Bill Clinton’s not running. His wife is. But the Trump campaign aims to smear her as an enabler of sexual violence.

“We’re going to turn him into Bill Cosby,” Trump campaign CEO Steve Bannon told staffers, according to a Bloomberg report that quotes two unnamed Trump advisers who were present. “He’s a violent sexual predator who physically abuses women who he assaults. And she takes the lead on the intimidation of the victims.”

One could question whether, with all due respect to the accusers, Team Trump believes in protecting the rights of the accused. But this particular ploy of resurrecting accusations that were investigated but never prosecuted — even by special Whitewater prosecutor Kenneth Starr — at least 20 years ago is not designed to debate our criminal justice system. It is intended to tar the Clintons with crimes against women, a group that turned heavily against Trump even before the new allegations came out.

The new strategy began as a defensive move. Before the second debate, Trump was revealed in a 2005 “Access Hollywood” hot-mic video as boasting about using his celebrity status to go after women like a sexual predator. He apologized for what he called “locker room talk” and accused Bill Clinton of doing worse as president.

With his polls having shrunk to little more than his hardcore base of supporters and Election Day fast approaching, Trump and his campaign have pretty much abandoned efforts to reach out to undecided swing voters. Instead, their hope is to discourage wavering young women, in particular, who might be turned off enough to stay home instead of voting for Hillary Clinton.

As someone old enough to remember the 1990s quite well, I don’t think that trick’s going to work any better than the partisan pursuit of President Clinton did.

Now, in the final days of a contest between two candidates with the highest disapproval ratings of two nominees in memory, we can expect the alley fight to get uglier. Yet a ray of sunshine — and sanity — appeared later in the week. First lady Michelle Obama gave a speech on Hillary Clinton’s behalf that seemed to put an overdue moral compass on this competition of scandals.

She put aside her prepared speech, she said, because the idea that “a candidate for President of the United States has bragged about sexually assaulting women” is “not something that we can ignore” or sweep under the rug “as just another disturbing footnote in a sad election season.”

“We have everything we need to stop this madness,” she said to enthusiastic applause. “We have knowledge. We have a voice. We have a vote.”

We also have a remarkably poignant and powerful voice in Michelle Obama. It is no wonder that many people wish that she was on the ballot. But this First Lady has made it clear that she’s had it with Washington’s political circus, an attitude so sensible that, to me, it only makes her sound more attractive for the job.


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Opinion

PERSPECTIVE: Some quick lessons from Criminology 101

We may feel from TV shows and the news that we know a lot about crime — and yet, crime and criminology can be a highly complex topic that requires years of study for a full understanding. It’s such an important topic that it’s worth a quick look at the types of crime, a few things you can do to prevent them, along with some good news...
Opinion: ‘Scalia Speaks’ a collection that teaches about civility

I knew the late Justice Antonin Scalia a little, and like millions of others, I was an avid fan of his jurisprudence, the great bulk of which he produced after I was no longer a law student, so much the worse for me. Reading opinions as a law student was often like trying to swallow great bowls of sawdust — without milk. Very few judges can write...
Opinion: GOP is finally, sorta, willing to admit the obvious

Yes, he’s childish and incompetent. Is that really news by now? But of course, it wasn’t that assessment of Failed President Trump that made jaws drop over the weekend so much as it was the person making it. Meaning Sen. Bob Corker, who unleashed an extraordinary barrage of contempt on Twitter and in a New York Times interview. The Tennessee...
Opinion: Auto industry has glamorous past but opaque future

DETROIT — Bending metal, slapping on chrome and marketing an empowering product and status marker that mesmerized 20th-century America, the automobile industry typified the Old Economy, of which General Motors was emblematic. As was its bankruptcy. Today, GM’s CEO Mary Barra is wagering that the industry soon will be manufacturing New Economy...
COMMENTARY: Heading back to the days the Birchers

“Some people say I’m extreme,” an Indiana tea party leader told The New York Times at the height of the movement’s rebellion in 2010, “but they said the John Birch Society was extreme, too.” Uh-huh. The society, which still exists, enjoyed its heyday in the early 1960s and saw Communists everywhere. Robert Welch...
More Stories