breaking news

Red Cross says 21 staffers paid for sexual service in past 3 years

Jay Ambrose: How Trump’s stance against gun control controls guns


In the wake of the horrible, unbelievably sad and insane shooting massacre of 59 people in Las Vegas, on top of more than 500 wounded, it’s time to blame human evil on guns again. The misled, uninformed and, in some cases, ideologically twisted, don’t get it that the evidence of gun laws doing any good is leaky at best and that it’s antics like theirs that boost sales. A calm, cool reluctance, meanwhile, reduces them.

Here’s a demonstration of that proposition: the record-setting purchases of guns during the Obama administration and the drop during President Donald Trump’s time in the Oval Office. If you want studies and numbers, you will get them, starting with a study by the New York Times, hardly a fan of gun possession.

It concluded that “fear of gun-buying restrictions has been the main driver of spikes in gun sales, far surpassing the effects of mass shootings and terrorist attacks alone.” The analysis, a story said, was based on federal data showing how President Barack Obama’s varied calls for stifling sales were springboards for encouraging them.

“President Obama was the best gun salesman the world has ever seen,” a gun shop owner is quoted as saying in another news outlet, the Daily Mail. A story noted that a rising 10-year market up to 2015 had led to three times as many gun manufacturers as there had been. Still, another media source has cited a gun and ammunition trade association as being oh, so thankful to Obama for increasing gun jobs from 166,000 to 288,000 from 2008 to 2015 and income from $19.1 billion to $49.3 billion.

A great fear, of course, has been a confiscatory ban on at least some guns, and, given how both Obama and erstwhile presidential candidate Hillary Clinton have praised Australia’s gun laws, that’s more than a conspiracy theory. In Australia, the government banned semi-automatic rifles and shotguns and then gave people a year to sell any they already had to the government before they became criminals for owning them.

Clinton, in her 2016 campaign, helped instigate further gun purchases through such tactics as wanting to overturn a Supreme Court decision that she thought scuttled a Washington, D.C., law that people should lock up handguns that could lead to toddler deaths. The D.C. law actually banned ownership of all handguns. Right now she wants to ban silencers because they could lead to more mass shootings when they only silence enough to save the ears of shooters.

Trump is a Second Amendment champ, and, the day after he won the election, gun sales started a downward trot. This past July, even with price discounts all over the place, federal gun checks were reportedly down 25 percent from what they had been in 2016. As CNN has said, gun stores are wondering what in the world to do with their inventory, but there are fiercely angry politicians, pundits and others running to the rescue with their cries for sweeping gun measures that Republicans have thwarted.

One of the most vitriolic of these critics was a CBS legal executive quickly fired after speaking out on Facebook. She said she was not sympathetic with the victims of one of the worst mass shootings in history because those at this country music festival in Las Vegas were likely Republican “gun toters” who prevent good laws. What we know is that a great many were heroes helping to save lives, and what she did not understand is the conclusion of a 2013 federal study that gun ownership makes citizens safer and that it’s uncertain whether gun laws reduce violence.

A small enough law that might make sense would ban a device that enabled the killer to make a semiautomatic rifle shoot as rapidly as an automatic that is already practically illegal. But the unifying speech Trump made after the attack did far more for the American good than divisive cries for futile measures, and his stance against more gun control has done more to control guns.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Opinion

Opinion: GOP tax reform used to be unpopular. Not anymore.

WASHINGTON — When the Republican-controlled Congress first approved its tax bill in December, most Democrats believed it would be a political loser for the GOP. Indeed, a New York Times poll found that just 37 percent of Americans approved of the plan. “To pass a bill of tax cuts and have it be so unpopular with the American people is an...
Opinion: Everybody’s better than you-know-who

Perhaps you read this week that Donald Trump has replaced James Buchanan as the worst president in the history of the United States. This was in a survey of experts in presidential politics — people who have an opinion about whether Chester A. Arthur was better than Martin Van Buren. Trump came in last, with a score of 12 out of 100. Perhaps...
Opinion: Gun control about saving lives, not waging culture wars

WASHINGTON — You have perhaps heard the joke about the liberal who is so open-minded that he can’t even take his own side in an argument. What’s less funny is that on gun control, liberals have been told for years that if they do take their own side in the argument, they will only hurt their cause. Supporters of even modest restrictions...
Opinion: Photo captures Trump's notes for listening session
Opinion: Photo captures Trump's notes for listening session

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump held a worthwhile listening session Wednesday featuring a range of views on how to combat gun violence in schools. And while Trump's at-times-meandering comments about arming teachers will certainly raise eyebrows, for the most part he did listen. Thanks in part, it seems, to a helpful reminder. ...
Opinion: Going to school shouldn’t turn into a death sentence

MIAMI — I know a high-school senior who hadn’t heard the awful news from Parkland before he got home Wednesday. He stared at the television and said, “What?” And, moments later, shaking his head: “What the hell?” This young man doesn’t know anyone who goes to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High, though it’s...
More Stories