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Reader questions the costs of progress


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Often, so-called progress is regression, the antonym for evolution.

Evolution is a healthy, natural, long term form of progress. Revolution tends to be destructive. Evolution is sustainable progress. Survival of the fittest, when studied more closely is really survival of those who cooperate. We’re tribal by nature. Empathy is hard wired into us. How can we call our widening wealth gap in America progress? Our preventable health care crisis? The destruction of the soil that grows our food? The pollution of our air, wells, streams, lakes and oceans? Rampant drug abuse; why are so many people escaping reality? News too often reflects serious regression. How can we call that progress?

A few years ago, I began an experiment adopting some of the habits of the notoriously healthy, active people thriving off the grid in the rugged Copper Canyons of Mexico. They are the Raramuri, also known as the “running people.” Coach Joe Vigil studied them and he taught his world-class runners the philosophy of worshipping the goddess of wisdom, not the goddess of wealth. Coaching them to eat like you’re third-world poor. He meant they should eat organic rice and beans, and do some training barefoot.

Nearly six years into an all plant foods diet, running barefoot and in open huarache sandals, I’m an injury-free runner for over five years. No meat, no eggs, no dairy, no padded shoes with arch support; no problem. This is the easy way to run 100-mile foot races. Progress for me is moving away from dis-ease and toward ease. It’s a lot of work.

The third-world poor Raramuri may have more to teach us, than us them. Destroying our land, air and water to grow GMO crops to feed animals that suffer before making us sick is regression. How can progress be regression?

True progress might happen when GDH (Gross Domestic Happiness) is at least as important as GDP (Gross Domestic Product, a measure of the dollar value of goods and services). Technology that helps lead us to better health and happiness is a form of sustainable progress.

Evolution, not Revolution. RANDY KREILL, BEAVERCREEK

Pitts wrong about ‘fake news’

Re “Want to avoid fake news? Then open a newspaper,” Nov. 27: Leonard Pitts claims opening a newspaper will help you avoid fake news. While he freely admits there may be bias, he skims over the fake news on shows like “Saturday Night Live” as merely humor, conveniently forgetting how a skit on SNL portrayed Sarah Palin as a dimwit was often quoted by newspaper and broadcast journalists as things Palin actually said.

Then we have the news that is suppressed. Untold stories about foreign donations to the Clinton Foundation, and how they led to action by the State Department. Then we had the polls put out by many newspapers who over-sampled Democrats to make it look like Hillary was leading in spite of her unpopularity in most states.

However, lies of omission are just as bad as lies told, and Pitts would have to admit that newspapers are guilty of doing a lot of that. TOM FENNER, PIQUA

Trump should take on Congress

Re “Federal workers brace for changes,” Nov. 28: The first thing President-elect Trump should propose to save a lot of money is to tie pay to performance for members of Congress and to prohibit them from making Congress a career and being eligible to receive a pension after being a member of Congress for only a few years. For the past eight years we wouldn’t have paid any of them anything for their complete incompetence.

Federal employees are hard-working professionals who dedicate their lives and careers to serving the public rather than chasing higher incomes in the private sector. We need to be careful we don’t repeat history and decimate our federal workforce again. DENNIS LOVEJOY, FAIRBORN


Reader Comments ...


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