Democratic Ohio governor candidates to debate Tuesday

Debate is first of the 2018 election cycle, first for Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley.


Democrats hoping to replace Gov. John Kasich will meet for their first debate on Tuesday.

Both parties have crowded fields for the May primary election, and it could get even more crowded before Election Day.

The debate is at 7 p.m. at Martins Ferry High School in Martins Ferry, a small city near the West Virginia border.

The location may seem remote to most people, but there’s a strategy to choosing the location.

RELATED: Who is running for Ohio governor?

Martins Ferry is in Belmont County — a county President Donald Trump won in 2016 with 52 percent of the vote. However, President Barack Obama won the county in 2012 and in 2008. Democratic Party leaders are hoping to flip some of the counties that went for Trump in 2016 back to the Democratic column in 2018.

RELATED: Democrat Connie Pillich proposes public health care buy-in

The candidates taking part in the debate are Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, Youngstown-area state Sen. Joe Schiavoni, former Akron-area Congresswoman Betty Sutton and former Cincinnati-area state Rep. Connie Pillich.

You can watch the debate stream live on our Ohio Politics Facebook page.

Innovation Ohio CEO/President Janetta King will moderate the 90-minute debate.

The Democratic field for governor has been at four declared candidates for months, but there are other candidates rumored to be considering a run. Former state attorney general and treasurer Richard Cordray, former Cleveland Congressman and presidential candidate Dennis Kucinich and talk show host and former Cincinnati Mayor Jerry Springer are all said to be considering jumping in the race.

On the Republican side, candidates include Attorney General Mike DeWine, Secretary of State Jon Husted, Congressman Jim Renacci and Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor.

Related: Cordray mum on possible governor run

Related: How much are Ohio governor candidates worth?



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Politics

Worker who sent mistaken missile message reassigned
Worker who sent mistaken missile message reassigned

The person who hit the button that sent an emergency alert warning people living in or visiting Hawaii that a ballistic missile was heading to the island state has been reassigned. USAToday reported that the person responsible for the mistaken alert has been reassigned. That individual, who has not been named, has worked for the agency for a decade...
Jordan: Clinton, not Trump, sought Russia help to influence election
Jordan: Clinton, not Trump, sought Russia help to influence election

Rep. Jim Jordan has emerged as a top defender of President Donald Trump as the Justice Department’s Russia investigation continues, leading some to wonder if the GOP insurgent known for causing heartburn to the party establishment has become a surrogate for the president. For Jordan, it’s very straightforward: He says it was the Hillary...
24-year-old helps lead Trump drug policy office
24-year-old helps lead Trump drug policy office

In May 2016, Taylor Weyeneth was an undergraduate at St. John's University in New York, a legal studies student and fraternity member who organized a golf tournament and other events to raise money for veterans and their families.  Less than a year later, at 23, Weyeneth, was a political appointee and rising star at the Office of National Drug...
Romney’s role: Ally to Trump, or adversary?
Romney’s role: Ally to Trump, or adversary?

A few days after Sen. Orrin G. Hatch of Utah announced that he would conclude his tenure after serving 42 years in office, the state’s governor, Gary Herbert, was growing anxious about whether Mitt Romney would run for the seat.  “Let’s not be coy about this,” Herbert said he told a close Romney friend and prominent business...
In planned speech, Sen. Jeff Flake compares Trump’s media attacks to comments by Stalin
In planned speech, Sen. Jeff Flake compares Trump’s media attacks to comments by Stalin

Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., plans to give a speech in the coming days that compares President Donald Trump's public criticism of the news media to similar comments once made by Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin.  A spokesman said that Flake, who will retire after this year amid intense political pressure sparked by his criticism of the president, plans...
More Stories