Gov. John Kasich says current health care bill is ‘unacceptable’


Ohio Gov. John Kasich has urged Sen. Rob Portman not to accept “a few billion” to fight the nation’s opioid epidemic in exchange for drastic cuts to Medicaid, saying that the former would be “like spitting in the ocean.”

RELATED: Kasich calls for bipartisan talks on health care in Congress

Kasich, appearing in D.C. Tuesday for a press conference with Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, a Democrat, said he last spoke to Portman, who may be a key swing vote on the Senate health care vote that could be voted on as early as this week, few weeks back. “He knows what my concerns are,” he said, but cautioned “I don’t cast his vote.”

At least six Republican U.S. senators have expressed concern about the Senate health care bill unveiled last week, with one – Sen. Susan Collins of Maine – expressing concern after the release of a Congressional Budget Office Report last week that found that the Senate bill would cost some 22 million health care over the next decade.

RELATED: John Kasich slams House GOP over health-care bill

Kasich – who was already scheduled to be in town for a meeting with the board of directors of Siemens - has long expressed concern about House and Senate Republicans’ plans to roll back a Medicaid expansion from the 2010 Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare. Some 700,000 Ohioans – including many of the state’s drug addicted – received coverage under that Medicaid expansion.

Kasich – who also objected to the House bill that passed in May – said the current bill is “unacceptable” and lacks the resources to cover the mentally ill, addicted and working poor. He supports making mental health and addiction services “essential benefits” that states are required to offer, but is more concerned that the drastic cuts in expenditures will leave people without coverage.

“If they don’t want to improve this bill, I’m not for this bill,” he said.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Politics

Clark County to spend $140K for consultant for combined 9-1-1 center
Clark County to spend $140K for consultant for combined 9-1-1 center

Clark County will spend $140,000 to hire a consultant to oversee the process of creating a unified countywide 9-1-1 dispatch center. Clark County commissioners voted unanimously this week to hire Fairfax, Va.-based Federal Engineering Inc. to help it transition from its current location at the Clark County Jail to the Springview Government Center....
Should Springfield ban smoking in cars with kids?
Should Springfield ban smoking in cars with kids?

A smoking ban in cars with children in Springfield could be problematic because it would only be in effect in the city limits, local leaders said, but they’re willing to talk about it. The city of Honolulu sparked a national debate on Oct. 18 when the city’s council voted unanimously to enact a ban on smoking and use of electronic cigarettes...
Johnson says Senate tax bill would hurt small businesses (like his own)
Johnson says Senate tax bill would hurt small businesses (like his own)

Here's what Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., the first Republican to oppose the Senate tax bill, doesn't like about the measure: It would slash tax rates for conventional corporations and give a much smaller tax cut to firms like the four in which he has millions of dollars in investments.  Johnson's office says he does not support the Senate bill because...
O’Neill’s boast of sexual liaisons brings calls for his resignation
O’Neill’s boast of sexual liaisons brings calls for his resignation

A Facebook post touting his sexual exploits with “50 very attractive females” Friday had colleagues expressing shock and political opponents calling for Ohio Supreme Court Justice Bill O’Neill to resign.   “I condemn in no uncertain terms Justice O’Neill’s Facebook post. No words can convey my shock,&rdquo...
The curious journey of Carter Page, the former Trump adviser who can’t stay out of the spotlight
The curious journey of Carter Page, the former Trump adviser who can’t stay out of the spotlight

Carter Page, PhD, is texting us in big paragraphs, from somewhere in New York, about his upended life.  "It's sort of like an extended plebe year ..." he writes.  (At Page's alma mater, the U.S. Naval Academy, first-year plebes endure a humbling boot-camp-style orientation.)  "... bringing the humiliation to a national...
More Stories