Health care, jobs, opioid crisis: What issues do you want next governor to tackle?


The race for Ohio’s next governor is taking shape, but it’s a long time until November 2018.

However, the candidates are making promises already to take on issues such as Ohio’s growing overdose epidemic, Medicaid reform, taxes and education.

The latest Republican to join the race, Attorney General Mike DeWine said on Sunday, “When I am governor our state will be fundamentally different.”

RELATED: Mike DeWine announces run for governor

All of the candidates have said something similar in their campaigns.

Whether it’s Secretary of State Jon Husted, Congressman Jim Renacci or Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor on the Republican side, or Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, state Sen. Joe Schiavoni, former Congresswoman Betty Sutton or former state Rep. Connie Pillich on the Democratic side, they all are talking about jobs, taxes and Ohio’s opioid crisis.

Some readers on our Ohio Politics Facebook page told us what issues they care about:

Lee Parks: 1. Affordable healthcare for older adults not yet eligible for Medicare, not offered by their employer. 2. Balance the budget without robbing peter to pay paul. 3. Initiate work for welfare for all a abled bodied individuals which means create and attract more jobs to Ohio, no welfare for illegals.

Rita C. Demko: Education quality, ACA, Vocational training with apprenticeship/ internship.

Matthew M. Leclaire:1. Single payer healthcare 2. Tax reform to undo Kasich’s regressive sales tax approach 3. Increase education spending.

What issues do you want the next governor to focus on? Speak out on our Ohio Politics Facebook page.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Politics

Schumer’s ‘cave’? Shutdown deal puts spotlight on Dem leader
Schumer’s ‘cave’? Shutdown deal puts spotlight on Dem leader

Republicans tried to make Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer the face of the government shutdown. Now, he’s becoming the face of the Democratic retreat. For two days, Schumer, perhaps the most powerful Democrat in Washington, succeeded in keeping his party unified in a bid to use the government funding fight to push for protections for some...
Ohio inmate wants to be killed by firing squad
Ohio inmate wants to be killed by firing squad

Attorneys for a condemned killer whose execution was stopped last year after 25 minutes of unsuccessful needle sticks are once again recommending the firing squad as an alternative. The execution could also proceed if the state adopts a closely regulated lethal injection process that includes a headpiece to monitor the brain activity of death row inmate...
‘Defiance Disorder’: Another new book describes chaos in Trump’s White House
‘Defiance Disorder’: Another new book describes chaos in Trump’s White House

In late July, the White House had just finished an official policy review on transgender individuals serving in the military and President Donald Trump and his then-chief of staff, Reince Priebus, had agreed to meet in the Oval Office to discuss the four options awaiting the president in a decision memo.  But then Trump unexpectedly preempted...
President Trump signs bill ending government shutdown
President Trump signs bill ending government shutdown

A Senate standoff that partially shuttered the federal government for nearly three days ended Monday when Senate Democrats agreed to support a bill to re-open the federal government through Feb. 8. Sen. Sherrod Brown joined 31 Democrats and independent Angus King of Maine in backing the spending bill, which they did under the condition that the GOP...
Why other countries don’t have government shutdowns
Why other countries don’t have government shutdowns

Hundreds of thousands of workers are expected to stay home this week, after the Senate was unable to reach a deal Sunday night to end the government shutdown which began three days ago. This may not be the first time in recent history that funding for government operations and agencies was interrupted — since 1976, there have been 19 shutdowns...
More Stories