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Impact Ohio conference coming to Dayton


Impact Ohio will hold a conference in Dayton on Nov. 9 that will bring together the region’s business and community leaders.

“Our general goal is we try to bring an engaging dialogue on topics of public policy and politics that are important to local communities,” said Jennifer Flatter, chief executive of the Impact Ohio LLC.

“The conference is going to be a way to talk politics and public policy important to the Dayton region.”

The event at Sinclair Community College is in conjunction with a Nov. 8 pre-conference reception at The Steam Plant. Each event costs $35 and the deadline for registration is Nov. 2. 

The lead sponsors for the event are The Dayton Daily News, the Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce, and The Success Group.

Flatter said the conference will include a discussion of the opioid crisis by a panel that includes Helen Jones Kelley, executive director of the Montgomery County Board of Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services and state Rep. Jeff Rezabek, R-Clayton.

Chris Kershner, vice president of public policy and economic development, will moderate a panel discussion of the region’s importance to Ohio politics by Mike Dawson, creator of ohioelectionresults.com, and Janetta King, president and chief executive of Innovation Ohio.

Other speakers include representatives of the Ohio Democratic and Republican parties, Dayton Daily News statehouse reporter Laura Bischoff and WHIO-TV reporter Jim Otte.

Impact Ohio was formed in 1984 by The Success Group, an Ohio-based public relations and lobbying group. Until this year Impact Ohio’s conferences were held after elections in Columbus and focused on changes expected to occur in Ohio as a result of the election.

Flatter said this is the first year that the conferences have also been held regionally, with events in Toledo, Cincinnati, Akron and now Dayton.

“I think if we develop a relationship between two people that may not have existed before that that may be beneficial to their community, I think it is a successful event,” Flatter said.



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