You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to myDaytonDailyNews.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and bonus content- exclusively for subscribers. Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks

X

Welcome to myDaytonDailyNews.com

This subscriber-only site gives you exclusive access to breaking news, in-depth coverage, exclusive interactives and bonus content.

You can read free articles of your choice a month that are only available on myDaytonDailyNews.com.

Sports casualty of Wright State cuts: Swimming, diving programs


Wright State is eliminating its men’s and women’s swimming and diving teams as part of the $30.3 million in budget cuts announced at the university board of trustees meeting Friday morning.

»RELATED: Wright State hits its ‘low point’ with announcement of layoffs, budget cuts

The move is expected to save approximately $500,000 annually in scholarships, salaries, travel and facility maintenance. The university will honor the scholarships of any of the 38 swimmers and divers who elect to remain to finish their degrees and coach Kyle Oaks’ contract, which runs through March 2018.

»RELATED: WSU budget cuts: School of Medicine may lose most, athletics least

“You don’t want to do these type of things,” Wright State athletic director Bob Grant said. “It’s a day you hope never comes. It’s painful. It literally makes me sick to my stomach. But when you’ve got to make these kind of cuts, you’ve got to be pragmatic about it.

“It’s been literally weeks and weeks of ongoing conversations,” Grant continued. “Almost from the time Dr. (Curtis) McCray came on board as the interim president, we’ve talked about any kind of cost-cutting measures. And they’re having those conversations with everyone on campus. The budget crisis is real, and I think everyone on campus has taken very seriously the thought that we’re going to have to do what’s best for the long-term success of the university.”

Despite the elimination of swimming and diving, the proposed 2018 budget shows an increase of $1.6 million in funding for the athletics budget.

Grant informed Oaks of the decision Thursday, and Oaks planned to inform the athletes, many of whom have returned home for summer break, Friday morning. Grant also mailed letters to the student-athletes affected.

“It will be hard for them to see this and read this, but we’re here for them,” he said. “Some will want to transfer, and some won’t. We want what’s best for them. If they want to stay and not swim and finish their degree, we’re going to support the heck out of them. If they want to continue their swimming career and their education someplace else, we’re going to help like crazy with that.

“These are wonderful student-athletes,” Grant continued. “They’re terrific ambassadors for the university. I care about them personally very much, which makes this very, very difficult.”

The men’s and women’s swimming and diving programs have been in existence since 1974, and have competed at the Division I level since 1987. They have combined to win 18 conference championships along with 228 individual and 77 relay titles.

Oaks has coached the men’s and women’s programs since 2013.

“I think the world of him,” Grant said. “He’s a first-class individual. He represents us well. I’m personally very, very fond of him, so this was a very painful conversation.”

The Raiders have competed at the WSU Natatorium since the program was founded, and the condition of that 44-year-old facility weighed heavy in the decision to cut the swimming and diving programs.

“Our facilities for the most part are wonderful, but any kind of long-term strategic plan we’ve ever done, we can’t seem to find any way to provide a championship-caliber facility for swimming and diving,” Grant said. “A new facility would cost millions and millions of dollars, and in our current situation that’s not possible.”

Eliminating swimming and diving drops WSU to the minimum threshold of 14 intercollegiate sports to remain a Division I program.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Sports

Former Troy standout named new football coach at Northwestern
Former Troy standout named new football coach at Northwestern

Northwestern athletic director Jeff Hobby had to lead one of the quickest coaching searches of his career this month to find a new football coach, but he believes he’s found a coach that can make school’s program into one of the area’s best. Former Troy standout Shane Carter was approved by the school board last Thursday to lead the...
Reds’ Robert Stephenson pitching better in May
Reds’ Robert Stephenson pitching better in May

Robert Stephenson remains an option for the Cincinnati Reds if they decide to go a different way with their starting rotation. With Bronson Arroyo (3-4, 6.75 ERA), Tim Adleman (2-2, 6.19) and Lisalverto Bonilla (0-2, 6.38) struggling, the Reds have the worst rotation in baseball. The starters’ 5.81 ERA is more than two points higher than the...
Start of Bengals OTAs special for Thompson, Jackson
Start of Bengals OTAs special for Thompson, Jackson

The start of OTAs can have a routine feel for some players as their years in the NFL roll on, but the start of practice Tuesday was especially meaningful for a couple of Cincinnati Bengals. It marked the first practice for cornerback William Jackson since the 2016 first-round pick tore his pectoral muscle Aug. 1. And it signified the end of an even...
Regional high school track and field meets
Regional high school track and field meets

The following are this week’s regional track and field times and sites. The top four in each event advance to next week’s state meet at OSU’s Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium in Columbus. WEDNESDAY D-I at Welcome Stadium, Dayton 5 p.m. field events: Boys pole vault, long jump, discus; girls high jump, discus. 6:30 p.m. running events...
Schebler exceeding expectations after slow start
Schebler exceeding expectations after slow start

Pitcher Tim Adleman saw a group of reporters standing by right fielder Scott Schebler’s locker at Great American Ball Park on Tuesday. “You guys waiting to talk to Babe Ruth?” Adleman asked. Schebler needs 689 home runs to catch Ruth. A more realistic goal would be leading the National League in home runs. No Red has done that since...
More Stories