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Roost to close Kettering location this fall

Hiring mostly robust across region


Hiring is healthy and unemployment rates are mostly holding steady across the region.

According to the newest sub-state numbers for October 2017, the unemployment rate in Dayton was 5.3 percent, the same as September 2017 and improved from the 5.7 percent unemployment rate reported in October 2016.

In Kettering, the jobless rate last month was put at 3.9 percent, up a tick from 3.8 percent September but down slightly from 4 percent in October 2016.

RELATEDDayton region bright spot: Thousands of jobs announced this year

Across Montgomery County as a whole, the state reported the unemployment rate as 4.6 percent, up slightly from 4.5 percent in September 2017 and down slightly from 4.7 percent in October 2016.

Greene County’s unemployment rate both last month and in September was 4 percent. That’s an improvement from 4.2 percent in October 2016.

In Butler County, the jobless rate last month was 4.2 percent, up slightly from 4.1 percent in September but down from 4.3 percent in October 2016.

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In Hamilton, the jobless rate held steady at 4.5 percent for both October and September, which was down from 4.6 percent in October 2016, the state reported.

Warren County had a 3.9 percent unemployment rate in both October and September this year, down a bit from 4 percent in October 2016.

RELATEDManufacturer’s success reflects Dayton industry ‘resurgence’

Clark County has a 4.4 unemployment rate for both October and September this year, down from 4.8 percent in October 2016.

In the city of Springfield, the jobless rate was put at 4.7 percent, down from 4.8 percent in September and down from 5.6 percent, which was reported last October.

Across the state as a whole, the October 2017 jobless rate was 4.5 percent, improved slightly from 4.7 percent in September and 4.7 percent in October 2016.



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