breaking news

Downtown shop closing after more than 30 years 

Wright State gets $450K for physician training

The grant is aimed at addressing doctor shortage and improve care.


Wright State University has been awarded more than $450,000 to help train and prepare primary care physicians for the changing world of family practice at a time when the nation is facing a shortage of primary care providers.

Nearly 20 percent of Americans have inadequate or no access to primary care physicians because of a shortage of providers, even though a majority of them are insured, according to a recent report by the National Association of Community Health Centers and the American Academy of Family Physicians.

The Wright State grant from the federal Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) is intended to help strengthen the primary care workforce by enhancing clinical training for new models of practice, such as patient-centered medical homes — a new model of care that involves coordinating and customizing services for individual patients.

“This (grant) gives us the money to expand curriculum and teaching in that regard,” said Dr. Therese Zink, professor and chair of the department of family medicine at Wright State’s Boonshoft School of Medicine. “Health care is transforming into inner-professional teams…so it’s not just the doctor and the patient anymore, it’s the doctor and his team and the patient, depending on what the patient’s needs are.”

The grant, for $451,764, was part of more than $149 million in new HRSA awards through 12 workforce programs to prepare the next generation of skilled, diverse primary care providers to serve communities in need across the country.

“These awards will help increase access to quality health care for all Americans by educating and training culturally competent providers who are prepared to practice in high-need areas,” said HRSA Acting Administrator Jim Macrae. “By encouraging partnerships among academic institutions, clinicians, health care sites and public health entities, we can improve health outcomes in under-served communities.”


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Local

Elwell: Start of fall brings more active weather to area
Elwell: Start of fall brings more active weather to area

Right on cue, fall arrived in the Miami Valley over the weekend. Indeed, it is likely we saw our last 90-degree day for the next 8 months last week. Temperatures dropped almost 40 degrees in just about 36 hours between Thursday to Saturday morning. Such a dramatic change in temperatures can sometimes fuel big storms. While the threat was there last...
Prosecutor to refile rape case, man ‘will have to answer for his conduct’
Prosecutor to refile rape case, man ‘will have to answer for his conduct’

TROY – Miami County Prosecutor Tony Kendell said Monday he would refile a rape case against a Troy man and former Ohio High School Athletic Association official after dismissing the case Friday. Kendell confirmed Friday he would refile the case against Henry Lucas, 53, and would issue a statement Monday. In that brief statement, he said he wanted...
Frozen embryos mistakenly destroyed at Seattle hospital 
Frozen embryos mistakenly destroyed at Seattle hospital 

Dozens of women hoping to have children are dealing with heartbreaking loss after their frozen embryos were mistakenly destroyed at the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle. >> Read more trending news  Tina Mankowski, director of strategic communications for UW Medicine, confirmed that 31 patients were...
Election 2018: Turner criticizes Gasper comment about Wright-Patterson Air Force Base
Election 2018: Turner criticizes Gasper comment about Wright-Patterson Air Force Base

Congressman Mike Turner is taking issue with a comment his Democratic opponent Theresa Gasper made recently about Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. At a candidate night event, Gasper said that Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is “an enduring base, it’s never going to close, unless someone blows it up,” according to a video provided...
Mass casualty drill may mean gun shot, explosion noises downtown
Mass casualty drill may mean gun shot, explosion noises downtown

As part of local responders practicing for a mass casualty scenario, there may be loud noises like gun shots or an explosion near Miami Valley Hospital in Dayton on Thursday afternoon. The exercise will be from around 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday. MORE: With Enon ER, more health care options inch closer to Dayton market The full-scale and functional exercise...
More Stories