Area college to build new residence halls, liberal arts center


An area college is planning a number of big construction projects as part of its renewed 10-year master plan.

Cedarville University’s board of trustees approved a master plan earlier this month that calls for a newly constructed liberal arts center, a multipurpose facility that would house a welcome center, banquet center and the school of business administration, and a new center for cyber security, according to the college.

RELATED: Ohio college graduations cause spike in area Airbnb rentals

The 10-year plan also calls for several other big projects including an expansion to the university’s field house for locker rooms, a bigger weight room, classrooms and a new entrance; new residence halls and an expansion of a residence hall to make up for planned closures of older ones; and a dining area inside the library.

This news organization has asked a Cedarville University spokesman for a timeline on the projects.

“More important than the new facilities will be the opportunities they will provide for our faculty and staff to invest in students and see their lives transformed for godly service, vocational distinction, and cultural engagement.”

RELATED: Ohio college graduations cause spike in area Airbnb rentals

As part of the plan, the university could add signage and landscaping along the campus boundary at Ohio 72 and a fountain near the main entrance. With the approval of the board of trustees, the administration will now develop a fundraising campaign to raise money for the projects, according to the school.

A new women’s dorm called Walker Hall at Cedarville is scheduled to open this fall. The new hall will house 64 total students who will live in four 16-person units with shared living areas, bathrooms, kitchenettes and laundry rooms, according to the university.

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