Gem City Market food co-op gets a home in northwest Dayton


The Gem City Market will be built on the 300 and 400 block of Salem Ave., bringing a full-service grocery store to one of the largest food deserts in the state.

Market supporters this morning announced the location of the market, which will become Dayton’s first worker and community-owned co-operative grocery store.

MORE: Mountain bike park near UD Arena may get rolling

The market will be constructed on a vacant lot on the 400 block of Salem, but also the project will involve reusing the abandoned Ken McCallister Inc. art supply property at 300 Salem Ave.

Supporters this morning also announced the kick-off of the capital campaign to raise money to build the grocery store.

The goal is to raise $4.2 million, but more than a third of that investment has already been committed.

The market has a goal of selling 2,000 shares (or memberships) before it opens its doors. Supporters are approaching the half-way mark, with more than 920 memberships sold.

The hope is to open the market in 2019.

RELATED: Proposed grocery co-op has brisk sales of shares

The market, which will employ local residents, will offer fresh produce, meat, goods and other high-quality staple foods.

The market will be a unique draw because it will sell specialty, local and organic products, market supporters said.

Unlike most grocery stores, the Gem City Market will be owned by its workers, customers and community supporters, the market said in a statement.

The market has always been targeted for the lower part of the Salem Avenue corridor. One of the areas previously considered was the 100 block of Salem Avenue.

Market members get special prices and deals on some products, similar to rewards members at grocery stores.

TRENDING: DPS approves $575K in raises, ousts principal despite public outcry

Members also can vote or run for a seat on the market’s board of directors, get to participate in annual meetings to make decisions about the store and will share in the percentage of profit not reinvested in the store, the market said.

Memberships cost $100. But some people will qualify for a subsidized membership. There are payment plans to help spread out the membership fee.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Local

At least 13 dead in duck boat accident on Table Rock Lake in Branson, Missouri, officials say
At least 13 dead in duck boat accident on Table Rock Lake in Branson, Missouri, officials say

At least 13 people were killed and several others injured after a duck boat carrying tourists capsized Thursday night on Table Rock Lake in Branson, Missouri, according to authorities. >> Read more trending news  Update 10:05 a.m. EDT July 20: Authorities are expected to provide an update on the investigation into Thursday's deadly...
Clark County Municipal Court cases
Clark County Municipal Court cases

CASES CALLED WEDNESDAY INCLUDED: Scottie L. Cochran, 23, of 1220 Texas Ave., menacing, guilty, 30 days jail with 30 days suspended, fine and cost due Sept. 16, fined $50. William G. Dufner Jr., 33, of 1530 N. Belmont Ave., violation of temporary protection order, guilty, 60 days jail with 60 days suspended; violation of temporary protection order,...
Centerville boy found wandering alone for second time in a week
Centerville boy found wandering alone for second time in a week

For the second time in a week the same 10-year-old boy was found wandering alone around the city of Centerville and the boy's father could be facing additional charges for the latest incident, according to Centerville Police.  Officers were contacted around 6 a.m. Thursday after someone spotted the boy alone near Stingley Elementary School off...
Here’s why birds are being painted along downtown Dayton bridge 
Here’s why birds are being painted along downtown Dayton bridge 

Jes McMillan’s plan is going up with the birds. The owner of Crane Studio Market and founder of the nonprofit Mosaic Institute of Greater Dayton along with a crew that includes Vincent Detrick, Ileana Del Campo-Gray, Kate Edmondson and Amy Dallis are painting a mural on the train overpass near the intersection...
Full circle: Man spending retirement where he once lived as an orphan
Full circle: Man spending retirement where he once lived as an orphan

The way Lynn Weber maneuvers his motorized wheelchair around the Otterbein Senior Life campus, stopping just long enough to greet every resident and staff member, you get the feeling he’s right at home. He should be. His residence has come full circle. He’s like a NASCAR driver who kept turning left until he ended up right where he started...
More Stories