This local district is in the final stages of a $72M school building project. Here’s what’s new.


Lebanon is in the final stages of a multi-year, $72 million school building project.

Work will be done when the old elementary, where the school district offices are located, is demolished. The district offices will be moved to a renovated section of another old school, formerly the high school and then Lebanon Junior High, on Miller Road.

“The project this community supported should last for many, many years. I think it’s a testament to what the community thinks about its schools,” Superintendent Todd Yohey said.

RELATED: Construction begins on $27 million junior high

To get it all done, the district expects to spend more than $1 million not included in the building project funding in expectation of saving on $4 million in repairs otherwise needed on the former Holbrook Elementary School, where the district offices and board meeting room are located.

“From a financial standpoint, it just makes more sense,” Yohey said.

RELATED: Firm chosen in 2009 to explore Lebanon school construction needs

On Tuesday, Lebanon planners signed off on the renovation and demolition, clearing the way for the district offices to move into part of the building that has served as the district’s high and junior school.

The eastern part is to be demolished, with the rest left for the offices. The move is anticipated next summer or fall. The district’s auditorium and main gym will also remain there.

MORE: Lebanon boy to apologize, do 25 hours community service for school threat

“The project consists of renovating the existing school to be the new Board of Education office for the Lebanon City Schools. A new parking lot is envisioned for the north and south of the proposed office. The east part of the school will be demolished,” according to an application by the Kleingers Group to Lebanon Planning Commission.

With state and local funds, the district built a new $27 million junior high, just north of its predecessor.

The building at 160 Miller Rd. was built as a high school in the mid-1960s, replacing what was the previous high school and is now Berry Middle School, further south on Broadway.

MORE: Waynesville schools going forward with $26 million community development

Berry was also renovated as part of the district’s $72 million construction plan funded through state funds and local levies.

District voters approved a 1.87-mill levy to finance $56.8 million in local costs, including $27.4 million in principal and $29.4 million in interest.

Local voters also approved a 0.5-mill levy to fund continued maintenance required by the state to qualify for the funding. The Ohio Facilities Construction Commission is to contribute $45.1 million.

On Wednesday, Yohey said demolition of the eastern part of the Miller Road building was being postponed for more evaluation of asbestos remediation. Bids had pegged this project at $628,721 from state and local funds.

MORE: New schools in 2 districts exceed capacity

The former Holbrook Elementary, where the board offices have been located in a neighborhood off Columbus Avenue, is to be demolished and kept “as green space,” Yohey said.

The district has no plans to sell the land and “the future use is a crystal ball,” he added.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Local

New Perry Twp. police chief involved in crash in Dayton on West Third Street
New Perry Twp. police chief involved in crash in Dayton on West Third Street

Perry Twp. Police Chief Tim Littleton suffered a head injury, but was speaking with medics when he was taken to a hospital tonight following a crash in his cruiser. According to a Clayton police officer, Littleton was believed to have been responding to a burglary call in Trotwood. The Ohio State Highway Patrol is on scene, and is investigating the...
Experts: Don’t strap child in car seat with bulky coat on 
Experts: Don’t strap child in car seat with bulky coat on 

Strapping your child in a car seat while wearing a bulky coat could mean danger, experts say. This cold weather habit could leave as much as four inches between the car seat straps and your child. "That would cause the child to come out of it if they were in a crash," said Kelli Sharp with Dayton Children’s Hospital. Sharp estimates...
Walkaway from Montgomery County Jail work detail captured in Harrison Twp.
Walkaway from Montgomery County Jail work detail captured in Harrison Twp.

UPDATE @ 10:25 p.m.: Dillon Watson, the walkaway from a Montgomery County Jail work detail, has been captured at a house in Harrison Twp., in the area of Neff Road.  Watson reportedly ran out the back door of a residence when authorities approached the house.  Authorities are now following up on a tip that Dillon Watson, the walkaway...
Man charged in Dayton homicide now indicted in 2017 incident
Man charged in Dayton homicide now indicted in 2017 incident

A 26-year old Dayton man charged with murder in a shooting last month now faces charges for an incident that happened last November. Jamariyo Drane was indicted today on two counts of felonious assault, which carry firearm specifications. He also was indicted on burglary, robbery and having weapons while under disability for a prior offense of violence...
Experts: Card payment fraud on the rise; how to protect yourself 
Experts: Card payment fraud on the rise; how to protect yourself 

This holiday season, online and in-store shopping might not be as secure as you think. Experts say the risk of payment card fraud is on the rise, and remains a top concern for retailers despite the upgrade to chips. Using a chip card, or EMV payment system, is supposed to be safer but one expert says this isn’t always the case. “In 2015...
More Stories