19,000 Warren County voters will have a new polling place in November


More than 19,000 Warren County voters will be sent to a different polling place in November.

The moves, in 18 precincts from Mason to Springboro, mark the third time in four years that the Warren County Board of Elections has moved polling places.

Several moves are being made because the existing polling place asked to no longer participate in voting. Others are reorganizations that board of elections officials say will provide more central locations for those precincts.

Moving polls can cause confusion for voters who still cast paper ballots at local church, school or other location they’ve grown accustomed to, said Diane Noonan, director of the board of elections in neighboring Butler County.

“They get very accustomed to where we are at,” Noonan said.

RELATED: 2 Warren County polls moved due to safety concerns

In 2016, Warren County moved two polling places in response to fears about safety, according to Brian Sleeth, director of the Warren County Board of Elections.

In 2015, more than 5,000 voters from seven Springboro precincts were told to vote in a new location due to plans to demolish the Jonathan Wright School building in Springboro.

RELATED: Springboro school demolition prompts poll moves

The moves approved last month by the Warren County Board of Elections were made for some of the same reasons.

“It is no different, just that this is an extremely large move,” Sleeth said in an email.

In March, Montgomery County moved five locations used by 5,500 voters.

RELATED: Montgomery County moves polls for thousands

“It’s typical, we oftentimes have to change locations during the election cycles,” said Jan Kelly, Montgomery County Board of Elections director.

But poll moves are not standard operating procedure for some area election officials.

“We’re not moving any,” said Noonan. “Last election, we had to move one because a building was in litigation. We had to combine it with another polling location.”

One of the affected locations is Cornerstone Church on Columbus Avenue in central Lebanon, which was sold. Officials at first didn’t know what that meant for its availability in voting.

“A few days later, (new owner) Citygate called us and said they wanted to let us know as soon as possible that they were not going to participate in future elections,’ Sleeth said. “They were very nice, though, on the phone but told us that they had no interest in this.”

Brandy Wyley, operations director for Citygate, said the church was “in the middle of renovations” to be completed by next spring.

“We’ll revisit once the renovations are completed,” she said.

Springboro Baptist Church declined to continue participating as a polling place. Church officials could not be reached to comment.

Kings Local Schools also “asked us to move,” according to Sleeth. “There were concerns from parents and administrators that we had voting going on while students were in school.”

School officials could not be reached for further comment.

Two more precincts are being moved as part of the reorganization to locations more centrally located to the voters, according to Sleeth.

Cards have gone out in the mail advising voters of the changes. Sleeth complimented locations willing to take more voters even though the payment is only $50 per precinct.

“Obviously they are not doing this for the money,” he said.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Politics

Election profile: Down in the polls, Renacci’s colleagues say he’s used to uphill battles
Election profile: Down in the polls, Renacci’s colleagues say he’s used to uphill battles

U.S. Rep. Jim Renacci arrived in Congress in 2010 with a goal: He wanted to get on the powerful House Ways and Means Committee, which writes the nation’s tax laws. One of the few CPAs in Congress, he felt he had the expertise. But he was told he was too new, to let it go. He couldn’t. So every week, Renacci, now Sen. Sherrod Brown&rsquo...
Election profile:  Sen. Brown uses connections to win over those who think he’s ‘ruthless’ progressive
Election profile:  Sen. Brown uses connections to win over those who think he’s ‘ruthless’ progressive

After a recent appearance on MSNBC’s Hardball, a reporter asked Sen. Sherrod Brown about a Mediterranean restaurant in Dayton. Brown reached for his IPhone and left Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley a voice mail: “Why haven’t you ever told me about this great restaurant?” Acquaintances say that is vintage Brown: scribbling notes, calling...
Miami County leaders willing to pay share of new voting machines
Miami County leaders willing to pay share of new voting machines

TROY – The Miami County commissioners told Board of Elections representatives they are willing to spend more than the $1,096,490 the state has allocated for new voting machines that are the best for the county’s voters and for the elections staff. The commissioners met Wednesday with elections Director Beverly Kendall and board member Ryan...
Lawsuit filed against bureau once headed by Cordray day after Dayton debate
Lawsuit filed against bureau once headed by Cordray day after Dayton debate

In a move which could impact the governor’s race between Republican Mike DeWine and Democrat Richard Cordray, two employees of the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau have charged they were discriminated against by officials of the bureau once headed by Cordray. The lawsuit charges that the consumer bureau “maintains a biased culture...
Watch the full Ohio governor’s debate in Dayton
Watch the full Ohio governor’s debate in Dayton

The first Ohio governor’s debate, held Sept. 19 at the University of Dayton, featured a fiery face-off between candidates Mike DeWine and Richard Cordray.  You can watch the full debate in the video above, or you can watch it on your streaming device (like Roku, Amazon Fire or Apple TV).
More Stories