Re-elected Dayton leaders after easy win: ‘We’ve got momentum’


Two incumbent Dayton commissioners easily won re-election against two challengers Tuesday, prompting the winners to say voters think the city is headed in the right direction.

Joey Williams, who was the top vote-getter, and Jeff Mims Jr. defeated challengers Darryl Fairchild and Shenise Turner-Sloss.

Mims and Williams said they feel voters recognized the city’s resurgence under their leadership and said they can’t wait to get to work to extend the successes downtown deeper into residential neighborhoods.

“We think we’ve made strides and we’ve got momentum and we can take things further,” Williams said.

» GET COMPLETE ELECTION RESULTS HERE

Williams earned a fifth term in office, and Mims will serve a second four-year term.

Williams, the longest-serving current member of the city commission, garnered about 30.1 percent of the vote, while Mims pulled down 26.6 percent, according to unofficial final election results from the Montgomery County Board of Elections.

Fairchild and Turner-Sloss finished third and fourth, with 22.7 percent and 20.6 percent of the vote, respectively.

» RELATED: 7 squeakers in Tuesday’s election that prove your vote counts in close races

Historically, incumbents tend to have a big advantage in the city commission races, and the last sitting commissioner to be unseated was Idotha Bootsie Neal, who was defeated in 2003 by newcomer Matt Joseph, who still serves on commission.

There had been signs that the incumbents could be in for a tough battle.

Fairchild, manager of chaplain services at Dayton Children’s, lost his bid for a commission seat two years ago by a small margin and his campaign managed to out-raise Mims’ and Williams’ in the last reporting period.

Turner-Sloss, a former city of Dayton employee, campaigned with Fairchild and made some fierce attacks on what she described as the “deplorable” state of local neighborhoods.

» MORE: Sinclair’s overwhelming voter approval ‘a great birthday present’

But Williams and Mims on the campaign trail argued that Dayton has made great progress in recent years and is headed in the right direction, despite having some challenges.

Williams said he was honest with voters and shared what the city has done and what it is doing to improve Dayton and their lives.

“I never claimed the city was perfect — we have a lot to work on and I think we have a lot of improvements that we need,” he said. “But I also told voters that I was very confident that the team on the city commission has done a really good job, given the issues that we face.”

» MORE: Human Services levy’s big win shows ‘a willingness to help others’

Williams said in the next four years he wants to help push the redevelopment that has been rapidly taking place downtown out into the neighborhoods.

Mims said Tuesday’s results seem to indicate Dayton residents feel good about what’s going on in the city and trust the people in charge of making the important decisions.

» MORE: No contest on Issue 1: Voters say give crime victims more rights

Mims said the city has seen more progress and activities in the last four years than the three preceding decades. He said the next four years can be just as productive and the rebirth hopefully will accelerate with the right partnerships and investments.

“The win validates the fact that the city is headed in the right direction and more and more people know that,” Mims said.

Mims and Williams easily defeated their competition when they ran in 2013. This race was tighter, but nowhere near as close as some predicted it would be.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Politics

VA may expand private health care choices for veterans
VA may expand private health care choices for veterans

Veterans will have expanded private health care options under legislation passed by Congress, but some critics contend it could lead to more privatization of VA services. The measure was part of a sweeping $51 billion VA bill that would institute reforms within the federal agency. The Senate passed the measure in 92-5 vote this week, which continued...
Trump says N. Korea summit may be back on; Ohio lawmakers react
Trump says N. Korea summit may be back on; Ohio lawmakers react

President Donald Trump on Friday warmly welcomed North Korea’s promising response to his abrupt withdrawal from the potentially historic Singapore summit and said “we’re talking to them now” about putting it back on track. “Everybody plays games,” said Trump, who often boasts about his own negotiating tactics and...
Facebook and Twitter plan new ways to regulate political ads
Facebook and Twitter plan new ways to regulate political ads

Facebook and Twitter announced plans Thursday to increase transparency of political campaign ads, changes aimed at preventing foreign manipulation of the coming midterm elections.  Facebook said it would begin including a “paid for” label on the top of any political ads in the United States. Clicking on the label will take people to...
NRA host calls for legislation to limit reporting on mass shooters. Then he says he didn’t mean it.
NRA host calls for legislation to limit reporting on mass shooters. Then he says he didn’t mean it.

In the days after a shooter killed 10 people at a Texas high school, National Rifle Association spokeswoman Dana Loesch joined a chorus of conservatives in spotlighting a subject to blame that didn't involve guns.  "The media has got to stop creating more of these monsters by oversaturation," Loesch said on the NRA's television station...
GOP immigration rebels push ahead despite Trump veto pledge
GOP immigration rebels push ahead despite Trump veto pledge

House advocates for moderate immigration policies stood at the cusp of forcing votes on bills that would give young undocumented immigrants a pathway to U.S. citizenship — even as President Trump threatened to veto any legislation that did not hew to his hard-line views.  Backers of a rare procedural maneuver that would spark an immigration...
More Stories