Sex with animals in Ohio officially illegal


It is no longer legal in Ohio to have sex with animals.

Ohio’s law banning bestiality went into effect Tuesday.

“It’s a crime that defies explanation to the rational person,” said Mark Kumpf, director of the Montgomery County Animal Resource Center. “We’re dealing with a different species.”

RELATEDBestiality is legal in Ohio; lawmaker plans to outlaw it

RELATED: New bill undercuts local power, outlaws bestiality in Ohio

Previous efforts in 2011 and 2015 to ban it did not gain enough support in the Ohio General Assembly so Ohio was one of the few states that didn’t have an actual law on the books outlawing bestiality.

The bestiality ban finally got enough votes to pass in December after being folded into a bill that also bans local jurisdictions from raising the minimum wage or regulating pet stores.

The new bestiality ban:

* Prohibits a person from engaging in sexual conduct with an animal and related acts.

* Provides for the seizure and impoundment of an animal that is the subject of a violation.

* Authorizes a sentencing court to require an offender to undergo psychological evaluation or counseling.

* Makes bestiality a second degree misdemeanor punishable by up to 90 days in jail and a $750 fine.

State Senators Jim Hughes, R-Upper Arlington, and Jay Hottinger, R-Newark, sponsored the bill banning bestiality. Hughes had been trying since 2011 to get a ban in place and was supported by a variety of animal welfare groups.

SPECIAL REPORT: Ohio at center of war on cyber attacks

“I think this is something that is sickening and perverse and we don’t want Ohio to be the place you can come and have sex with an animal,” Hughes, R-Upper Arlington, said in an earlier interview.

Eight states and Washington D.C. still do not have laws against sexual conduct with animals.

Officials in those states might be more likely to ban sex with animals if they realized the connections between bestiality and child sex abuse, said aid Fairfax Virginia Police Detective Jeremy Hoffman, who spent years focused on internet crimes against children.

“I found that people who were engaged in crimes against children were also engaged in sexual crimes against animals,” Hoffman said. “It was people from everyday walks of life. There was no stereotype that you could pin to any of them.”

Like children, animals are incapable of consent and unable to tell on their abuser, said Hoffman.

He and Kumpf said state’s may mistakenly think animal cruelty laws are enough. But Kumpf said abused animals do not always sustain the kind of injuries that would lead to a cruelty conviction. The one case he recalls where the county confiscated a dog that had allegedly been sexually assaulted by a male resulted dismissal of the charges.

“It’s important that we have this as one of the tools in the box to deal with folks,” said Kumpf.

RELATED Ohio outlaws sex with animals



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Politics

Back taxes sought on 1,614 properties in Montgomery County
Back taxes sought on 1,614 properties in Montgomery County

The Montgomery County Auditor’s Office is mailing out notices to the owners of 1,614 properties across the county in an effort to recoup hundreds of thousands of dollars from a misapplied tax break that was first uncovered by the Dayton Daily News I-Team. The properties are owned by businesses, landlords and those claiming more than one address...
5 things to know about Dayton Commissioner Joey Williams’ resignation
5 things to know about Dayton Commissioner Joey Williams’ resignation

Joey Williams announced Wednesday evening that he will resign Friday as a Dayton city commissioner two months into a new four-year term. Here are five things to know about the resignation: 1. Longest tenure. Williams is Dayton’s current longest-serving city commissioner, with 16 years in office. He won re-election in November and just began his...
Butler County senator seeks review of Ohio’s medical pot program
Butler County senator seeks review of Ohio’s medical pot program

A state lawmaker is moving to force a thorough review of Ohio’s medical marijuana program after alleged and acknowledged mistakes occurred in selecting grower applicants. Sen. Bill Coley, R-Liberty Twp., proposed legislation Thursday requiring State Auditor Dave Yost to conduct and release a performance audit of the program. The program is supposed...
Should Reds be taxed for bobbleheads? Supreme Court to decide
Should Reds be taxed for bobbleheads? Supreme Court to decide

The Ohio Supreme Court says it will hear arguments in a dispute over promotions offered by the Cincinnati Reds to ticket buyers including bobbleheads and other items. At issue is whether the Reds are exempt from paying tax on the purchase of the promotional items. Attorneys for the Reds argue they don’t have to pay tax on the purchase of promotional...
Trump appears to voice support for raising assault rifle age to 21, presses case for arming some teachers
Trump appears to voice support for raising assault rifle age to 21, presses case for arming some teachers

President Donald Trump on Thursday appeared to voice support for raising the age at which someone could buy an assault rifle to 21, and he doubled down on his idea of arming some teachers as a deterrent for school shootings.  In a series of morning tweets, the president claimed the latter strategy would be far less costly than hiring guards and...
More Stories