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Village fiscal officer ‘negligent’ but theft in office charges dropped


The Ohio auditor’s office today ordered a former New Madison fiscal officer to repay $8,166 in mishandled public funds, months after theft in office charges against her were dropped.

The state audit released today says Wanda Lacey was consistently late in paying federal, state and local taxes and filing reports in 2013 and 2014, leading the village to pay penalties and interest for back taxes.

“This fiscal officer forced taxpayers to shoulder the consequences of her negligence,” Ohio Auditor Dave Yost said in a release. “She could have avoided these penalties by simply doing her job.”

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The finding for recovery – an order to repay the money – was issued against Lacey and her bonding company.

Meanwhile, charges that Lacey stole more than $21,500 from 2010 to 2015 – when she stopped working for the township – were dropped in September, according to Darke County court records.

Lacey had been free on a recognizance bond since shortly after those charges were filed in December 2016 after an indictment by a Darke County grand jury.

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Darke County Prosecutor Kelly Ormsby could not be reached for comment Thursday about why the charges were dropped.

Lacey’s attorney in the case, Dayton-based attorney Lawrence Greger, was also contacted for comment. This story will be updated once that comment is received.



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