5-year plan to spend $24.9 million

About $9 million will be spent on road projects.


City officials plan to spend nearly $25 million over the next five years on roads, utilities, equipment and the city’s golf course.

The plan increases capital spending more than $2.8 million over last-year’s five-year plan, budgeting $9 million for widening Ohio 741-Main Street and Ohio 73-Central Avenue, with construction projected in 2017.

“We appreciate we’re in such a great financial position compared to some of the other cities around us,” Mayor John Agenbroad said.

Still, city staff is working with the Ohio Department of Transportation and Miami Valley Regional Planning Commission to secure more outside funding. The city is also awaiting a budget from the Warren County Transportation Improvement District laying out the estimated cost of construction and land acquisition.

“I think it’s a really critical project for the city of Springboro,” City Manager Chris Thompson said.

Meanwhile traffic will continue to pile up at the intersection of the city’s main north-south and east-west routes.

The Springboro City Council endorsed the proposed 2015-2019 capital improvement program during a work session Thursday.

The spending blueprint draws on eight local funds, as well as anticipated state and federal funding and transfer of revenues from a o.5 percent income tax paid by residents who work outside the city.

The city plans to spend $5.5 million on water and sewer projects, $4.2 million replacing aging water mains in the Royal Oaks and Tamarack Hills neighborhoods. The biggest chunk of $1.3 million in park improvements is to fund a $1 million bridge across Clear Creek into Hazel Woods, a new 100-acre park Springboro and Franklin plan to develop together.

The bridge is just one investment the communities will need to make to complete plans for Hazel Woods, on land across from Springboro’s Clearcreek Park. Later this month, the city is to receive a master plan with cost estimates.

“There’s a very large number at the end of the rainbow,” Thompson said.

The city also plans to invest another $661,000 on Heatherwoode Golf Course, including work on the clubhouse, resurfacing the parking lot and a new $250,000 storage building replacing an aging barn in 2019.

Plans for the road repairs were set through 2019, but Thompson cautioned other spending in the later years was subject to change, particularly if an unanticipated emergency repair or other capital need took precedent.

“There’s just so much fluidity to it,” she said.


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