Dayton considers land sale, development deal at airport


Dayton City Commissioners tonight are expected to decide whether to grant a purchase option to a firm interested in developing 159 acres at the Dayton International Airport.

NorthPoint Development LLC wants a three-year purchase option on property located west of the airport facility, by the intersection of Airpark Boulevard and Dog Leg Road.

RELATED: More jobs coming to new airport industrial site

NorthPoint plans to construct a 440,000-square-foot building on the property. About 250,000 square feet of the facility will be occupied by a consumer goods company that has not been publicly identified.

NorthPoint already built and opened a 570,000-square-foot industrial warehouse north of U.S. 40 near Concorde Drive. The $33 million facility is occupied by Specrum Brands, which produces STP automotive products.

RELATED: Dayton airport to land $56M in new development, hundreds of new jobs

NorthPoint is building a second facility — at a cost of roughly $31 million — next door to the Spectrum property that is 524,160 square feet in size for unidentified end user. The two projects take up almost 90 acres.

NorthPoint’s third facility will take up about 32 of the 159 acres and construction is expected to begin in early March, said Terry Slaybaugh, Dayton’s director of aviation.

NorthPoint will pay the city of Dayton $10,000 each year during the purchase option period. The city says it will sell the property at its “fair market value” determined by an appraisal.

During the first six months, if the purchase and development agreement is approved, the purchase price will be about $25,000 per ace, city documents show.

Under the agreement, NorthPoint agrees to pay the city $1.5 million to help fund infrastructure improvements at and around the site.

Also at the commission meeting tonight will be a public hearing about a proposed amendment to the Butler Township-Dayton Joint Economic Development District (JEDD) contract.

The amendment would remove 149 acres that the city has acquired and is considering offering to NorthPoint from the JEDD.

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