Medical marijuana grow site in Clark County on state application list

July 12, 2017
A harvester examines marijuana buds from a trimming machine near Corvallis, Oregon. Researchers complain the government marijuana consists of leaves and unsmokable stems. ANDREW SELSKY/ASSOCIATED PRESS

A company is hoping to turn a warehouse facility between Dayton and Springfield into a growing site for medical marijuana, according to Clark County records.

Pure Ohio Wellness LLC has applied for a state license to become a Level 1 medical marijuana cultivation facility, meaning it could initially cultivate up to 25,000 square feet.

RELATED: State identifies medical pot applicants

County zoning records say they hope to put the facility at 4020 Dayton-Springfield Road in Mad River Twp. Records say the location is currently used as “storage for I-Supply products.”

The Ohio Department of Commerce released a list of 185 applicants for cultivation licenses – including Pure Ohio Wellness – but has not released the proposed locations. But all applicants had to secure forms from local zoning departments saying they are not prohibited from operating in each jurisdiction, and this news outlet is determining locations based on those forms.

The state will only approve two dozen applicants across the state.

Larry Pegram, part-owner of Pure Ohio Wellness, said in an interview Wednesday that they hope to be approved.

“We’re Ohio owned and operated and locally based, and we hope that makes a difference,” he said.

He said they hope to employ about 20 people at first – almost all locally hired — and up to maybe 50 as the state allows them to expand. He said they hope to get a license to process marijuana, but have no intention of seeking a dispensary license in Clark County.

Placement of marijuana cultivation sites has been controversial. The city of Springfield recently extended a moratorium on marijuana businesses there. Other area cities and townships have also banned marijuana businesses.

RELATED: Springfield extends medical marijuana moratorium until September

Pegram said he knows there are concerns, but he said the facility will be indoors and they will take steps to prevent even the odor of marijuana from leaving the building.

“If you didn’t tell somebody what was going on in that facility, you would never know,” he said.

Pegram said they are making medicine, not recreational marijuana.

“I think if people education themselves, most will change their minds if they’re not for it,” he said.

RELATED COVERAGE

Huber location eyed for medical marijuana grow site

Riverside delays vote on land sale for growing medical marijuana

4 companies looking to grow medical pot on Monroe locations