ODOT: U.S. 35 superstreet to reduce traffic congestion up to 53 percent


UPDATE @ 11:50 p.m.

Major U.S. 35 construction is projected to eliminate dangerous left-hand turns, reduce traffic congestion and decrease the severity of crashes.

Between 60 and 70 residents turned out Tuesday night to hear the Ohio Department of Transportation’s plans for the state’s second “superstreet” during a hearing at the Beavercreek Public Works Department.

The planned superstreet on U.S. 35 will create U-turns instead of left-hand turns at the Orchard Lane and Factory Road intersections, which had 100 crashes over the last three years. The project is estimated to cost $16 million to $17 million, ODOT District 8 spokesman Brian Cunningham said.

>> Greene County asked to kick in more cash for U.S. 35 ‘superstreet’

“What the superstreet will do will allow more traffic to flow through that particular area. It will help decrease the severity of crashes,” Cunningham said.

Anthony Smerk knows all about driving on that stretch of U.S. 35 in Beavercreek, especially the daily rush-hour backups. He works with the Beavercreek Soccer Association, which is along U.S. 35 between Factory Road and Orchard Lane.

“It can be a pain ... We live in a generation everybody wants to get there quick,” he said.

STAY CONNECTED: Greene County News on Facebook

The superstreet can cut traffic congestion by as much as 53 percent, but likely will involve a learning curve for motorists.

“It will take some time for folks to familiarize themselves with the different traffic patterns,” Cunningham said.

Drivers traveling across U.S. 35 from Factory Road and Orchard Lane won’t be able to go straight through without turning right and making a U-Turn. Those who want to go left onto U.S. 35 also would have to make a U-turn to get through.

The only superstreet in Ohio spans three intersections of the Ohio 4 bypass in Butler County. It opened in the fall of 2011.

RELATED: Superstreet confuses some Butler County drivers

Construction on U.S. 35 would take about three years, and wouldn’t begin until 2019, ODOT officials said.

“If all lthis works out it’s better for everybody, we’re all on board. There’s no problem with that,” Smerk said.

FIRST REPORT

The Ohio Department of Transportation will share the latest information on plans to build Ohio’s second superstreet on a section of U.S. 35 in Beavercreek.

The meeting is from 5 to 7 p.m. tonight at the Beavercreek Public Works Department, 789 Orchard Lane.

STAY CONNECTED: Greene County News on Facebook

Engineers will be sharing information and soliciting comments and feedback from those who attend, according to ODOT District 8 spokesman Brian Cunningham.

The superstreet project, estimated at $16 to $17 million, involves creating legal U-turns at the Orchard Lane and Factory Road intersections on U.S. 35. 

>>> Greene County asked to kick in more cash for U.S. 35 ‘superstreet’

Construction is not expected to begin until at least 2019, Cunningham said.

Ohio has only one other superstreet — state Route 4 bypass in Butler County. The aim of a superstreet is to reduce the severity and frequency of crashes by eliminating left-hand turns and straightaways from side streets across a busy thoroughfare, Cunningham said.

“It allows for more capacity for travelers and it lowers the severity of crashes and the crash rate,” he said.

The long-term plan to improve U.S. 35 overall is estimated to cost $120 million, according to ODOT.


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