Opinion: Entrepreneurs offer window to address social problems


DAVOS, Switzerland — When I visit university campuses, I’m periodically asked if students who seek jobs in the business world are immoral, money-grubbing sellouts.

I don’t think they are, for businesses can be a hugely important force for progress. Can be, but usually aren’t. Swirling in the air in Davos at the World Economic Forum was an important discussion of how companies must do far more to benefit the 99 percent, not just the 1 percent. Enriching shareholders is not enough.

Tycoons always claim to cherish ordinary people’s best interests even as they rip them off. U.S. tobacco executives have killed more people than Stalin managed to, and pharma executives recklessly peddling opioids may have killed as many people as Colombian drug lords, yet these business leaders sometimes seem to get moist-eyed describing the work they do.

But the business toolbox is too important to give up on. To me, the most interesting people in Davos aren’t the presidents or celebrities, but the social entrepreneurs — those using business tools to address social problems — and their work offers an inspiring window into what can be accomplished.

Christopher Mikkelsen works with two dozen companies, including cellphone operators and Facebook, to help refugees find lost members of their families.

Refunite is now helping more than 1 million refugees search for missing family members. It has already helped 40,000 of them connect, and Mikkelsen says this would never be possible if it were just an aid group rather than a hybrid piggybacking on business networks.

In Kenya, Christie Peacock tackles a huge problem for farmers: Much of the feed, medicine and other agricultural supplies for sale are fake or substandard, including about 60 percent of the fertilizer. When farmers buy fake seeds, their crops fail, and they go hungry.

Peacock previously worked in the aid world, but, she says, “I got disillusioned with the NGO model,” so her company, Sidai, is a for-profit venture founded with startup capital from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. It now serves 200,000 Kenyan farmers.

That’s the advantage of a business approach: It is often more sustainable and scalable than a charity. By working with African farmers to improve coffee production, Starbucks helps lift more people out of poverty than any number of aid efforts.

Among the giant corporations, there’s at least more of the right kind of talk. Laurence Fink, the chief executive of the investment firm BlackRock and one of the biggest investors in the world, shook the business world last week with an implicit threat to punish small-minded companies that “only deliver financial performance” without “a positive contribution to society.”

Doing good is no longer a matter of writing a few checks at the end of the year, as it was for my generation; for many young people, it’s an ethos that governs where they work, shop and invest.

CEOs tell me that this forces their hand. If companies protect groping scumbags, that hurts recruitment and they lose in the war for talent.

I believe the best industries for doing good are law (pro bono work) and certain pharmaceuticals (drug donation programs). That’s because they are held accountable by metrics: Big law firms are ranked by American Lawyer for their pro bono work, and pharma donations are rated by the Access to Medicines Index.

When companies with hundreds of thousands of employees elevate women, fight for Dreamers, adopt environment-friendly packaging, when they serve not only shareholders but also the larger society, the impact can be transformational.

Writes for The New York Times.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Opinion

Opinion: Trump’s curious coalition

Donald Trump’s strategy for keeping power is to build up his coalition of America’s white working class and the nation’s ownership class. It’s a curious coalition, to say the least. But if Democrats don’t respond to it, it could protect Trump from impeachment and even re-elect him. It just might create a permanent Republican...
Opinion: The Mississippi man tried 6 times for the same crime

One morning nearly 22 years ago, four employees of a furniture store in a small Mississippi town were shot to death. For months afterward, local law enforcement seemed stumped by the crime. Eventually, the top prosecutor — Doug Evans — charged a former store employee, Curtis Flowers, a black man who had no criminal record. The case since...
OPINION: Helping police understand people with disabilities

A concern of mine is to either be driving or riding with someone and getting pulled over by a police officer who hasn’t been properly trained on how to communicate and deal with a person who has a disability. First, let me commend all members of law enforcement, because I know they work very hard keeping our city safe. Truly, law enforcement...
Opinion: From Russia with love

Robert Mueller’s investigation into whether President Donald Trump and the Russians colluded to rig the 2016 presidential election so far has borne little fruit. The Democrats and their media allies would love to find some Russian collusion and interference. I can help them discover some, but I doubt that they will show much interest. Here it...
Opinion: When Harry marries Meghan, a most uncommon commoner

Marrying up. That’s what we usually say about a commoner who marries into a royal family. But by marrying Meghan Markle, you might say that Prince Henry of Wales — better known to most of us as Prince Harry — is marrying up too. After all, Markle, 36, is more than just a pretty face. Before the Northwestern University theater graduate...
More Stories