breaking news

Hundreds gather in Dayton for gun violence rally

Opinion: George Washington’s solution for sexual harassment

The avalanche of sexual harassment claims, with new ones pouring forth daily, leads me to the wisdom of George Washington’s observation in his farewell address in 1796:

“Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. … And let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be managed without religion.”

You may say, “There you go again, Star. Waving your Bible.”

But is there a better answer for dealing with this problem?

Society, all human life, is guided by rules. The only question before us is: What are the rules that we choose to live by?

Washington’s point is crucial. In a free society, one in which we want to minimize government and political control, we must maximize self-governance. Religion, and the morality that emerges from it, provides the rules by which free men and women govern their own behavior.

I will say further that the rules that we learn from scripture provide the framework for a society based on love, respect and creativity, as opposed to power and control.

And indeed, as we read accounts of the behavior of these men of wealth and influence, who have achieved what many Americans see as the pinnacle of American success, we read descriptions of the behavior of beasts, not men.

Sexuality, outside the framework of mutual love, commitment and respect between husband and wife, is transformed from a physical expression of intimacy and beauty to the gross and crass behavior of brutes.

That this appears to be so widespread in our society should trouble us all.

So what do we do?

I am a Christian, but I do not believe that our government was designed to mend men’s souls. It was designed to allow citizens to live free.

We cannot force citizens to do what Washington advises — learn and be guided by scripture.

What’s the alternative?

One is to forget it and let people do what they want. Let women fend for themselves when beastly predators with money and power threaten them.

Few will accept this option.

Alternatively, we can have politicians design our rules. But can this work? Without guidelines of scripture, how do we discern right and wrong, acceptable and forbidden?

This is the trend that has been going on for years. The less we self-govern through eternal Biblical truths, learned at home and at school, the more we grow government to control our lives.

In response to sexual harassment violations perpetrated by some members of congress, Congresswoman Barbara Comstock has introduced a congressional resolution requiring “all House Members, Officers, employees, including interns, detailees, and fellows, of the House of Representatives shall complete an anti-harassment and anti-discrimination training program during each session of Congress.”

Surely, similar programs will be popping up across industry. So instead of our workforce developing new and better products, more of their time will be spent sitting in anti-harassment training sessions, learning rules designed by bureaucrats.

The Mercatus Center at George Mason University published a report last year on the costs to our economy of the vast growth in the regulatory state from 1977 to 2012. The study concludes that accumulated regulatory growth reduced the size of the American economy in 2012 by 25 percent — $4 trillion of what it might have been.

Aside from economic costs, what are the human costs of our lives increasingly being controlled by bureaucrats?

According to research from Stanford University, 10 percent of married couples meet at work. So much for this, as men will fear giving a woman a second glance at work, let alone saying or doing anything that might hint he’s attracted to her.

I see only one viable path to a healthy, free nation. Choose to heed the wisdom of our first president.

Reader Comments ...

Next Up in Opinion

Opinion: Parkland kids are rewriting the playbook

Something came awake in them. That has to be the explanation. As they cowered in closets, as they said goodbyes and waited, with gunfire echoing down the halls, to die, something inside stirred itself. And when they didn’t die, when these teenagers left the campus of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High in Parkland alive — something 17 of their...
Opinion: Democrats dream of capturing California districts

LOS ANGELES — On a recent Sunday evening, Katie Hill, 30, whose father is an L.A. police lieutenant in Beverly Hills, boarded a red-eye flight to Washington for frenetic fundraising and networking. She must really want to get into the House of Representatives. If she does, she will have defeated a two-term incumbent, Rep. Steve Knight, 51, who...
Opinion: Who’s worse: Trump or his lawyers?

Gee, we’ve been hearing a ton about the turmoil in the president’s legal team. You probably have questions. Is this something else I have to think about in the middle of the night when I’m staring at the ceiling? Because really, I’ve got enough. We’re talking about chaos and turnover among the people defending Donald Trump...
Opinion: Liberals don’t hate America, and conservatives aren’t racists

WASHINGTON — I’m a rock-ribbed conservative who wants Republicans to keep control of Congress. But I’m not unhappy that Republican state Rep. Rick Saccone appears to have lost the special election in Pennsylvania’s 18th Congressional District. Why? Because he insulted my mother. Trailing his Democratic opponent in a district...
OPINION: Tillerson’s firing increases the risk of armed conflict

President Donald Trump’s firing of Secretary of State Rex Tillerson is a colossal and highly symbolic mistake. If Trump was elected to counter perpetual American military interventionism, which for decades has garnered a relatively meager return on investment, that non-interventionist posture is now being threatened as the proponents of realpolitik...
More Stories