5 somber memorials that commemorate 9/11 in the region

Updated Sept 10, 2018

Over the years, municipalities in the Dayton region have commissioned poignant monuments to pay tribute and provide a public remembrance for the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

Beavercreek, Urbana, Fairborn and Lebanon use pieces of contorted steel that were once part of the World Trade Center towers to commemorate the event. More than 1,200 pieces of steel have been delivered to cities throughout the country.

Columns of marble and granite represent the Twin Towers in two area memorials, while a 26,000-pound slab of Indiana limestone forms a natural monument in Kettering.

Here are five monuments that stand in the region:

Calamityville, the National Center for Medical Readiness

506 W. Xenia Drive, Fairborn

The 9/11 memorial at Calamityville, the National Center for Medical Readiness, 506 W. Xenia Drive Fairborn, serves as a connection not only to those who were lost on the planes, in the towers and the first responders but also the men and women who serve now, have served or made the ultimate sacrifice for their country. LISA POWELL / STAFF

A concrete slab stands tall next to a steel artifact from one of the World Trade Center towers. In relief on the slab are the outline of the towers above an inscription reminding all to never forget that day.

Surrounding the monument is a base in the shape of a pentagon. 

Beavercreek 9/11 Memorial

1153 N. Fairfield Road, Beavercreek

The Beavercreek 9/11 Memorial, a three-ton piece of steel, twisted and burnt, extends more than 25 feet into the sky along N. Fairfield Rd. in Beavercreek. At the base of the monument, once part of one of the world’s largest buildings, are two granite pillars representing the World Trade Center buildings. LISA POWELL / STAFF

A three-ton piece of steel, twisted and burnt, extends more than 25 feet into the sky along North Fairfield Road. At the steel monument, once part of one of the world’s largest structures, are two granite pillars representing the World Trade Center buildings.

Educational materials and a timeline of events line the walkway to the monument.

The city describes the memorial as a “gathering to honor those who tragically lost their lives, including many brave firefighters, police officers and paramedics who made the supreme sacrifice in their performance of duty.

"We also want to honor the military and the families of those who lost their loved ones and currently have sons and daughters, husbands and fathers in Harm's Way.”

Kettering’s Memorial for 9/11

Seitz Plaza at Lincoln Park, located at the corner of Ackerman and Lincoln Park boulevards, Kettering

Kettering's Seitz Plaza in Lincoln Park is home to John Van Alstine's stone sculpture, "Memorial for 9/11". LISA POWELL / STAFF Photo: Lisa Powell

Artist John Van Alstine’s stone sculpture, Memorial for 9/11, is located at Lincoln Park’s Seitz Plaza.

The 26,000-pound sculpture, made from Indiana limestone and welded steel, is part of Kettering’s CitySites public art collection and is designed as both a gathering and sitting space and a solar calendar. The solar noon sun aligns with the stylus on the monument on Sept. 11 each year. 

The Warren County 9/11 Memorial

Warren County Government Center, Memorial Drive, Lebanon

The Warren County 9/11 Memorial in Lebanon features a piece of I-beam from the World Trade Center and two 9-foot granite columns that represent the Twin Towers. LISA POWELL / STAFF
The Warren County 9/11 Memorial in Lebanon features a piece of I-beam from the World Trade Center and two 9-foot granite columns that represent the Twin Towers. LISA POWELL / STAFF Photo: Lisa Powell

This memorial features a piece of I-beam from the World Trade Center and two nine-foot granite columns representing the Twin Towers.

The names of two people with Warren County ties, Wendy Faulkner and Rob Peraza, are engraved on one of two granite benches that overlook the memorial.

Freedom Grove 9/11 Memorial

St. Rt. 55 and 68, Urbana

A burnt and twisted beam stands as a monument to 9/11 at Freedom Grove in Urbana. BILL LACKEY / STAFF

A burnt and twisted beam stands upright in the middle of a circular base in Freedom Grove, a six-acre park in Urbana.

The 12-foot steel support beam from the wreckage of the World Trade Center was designed by Urbana artist Mike Major and established by the Rotary Club of Urbana. It was dedicated Sept. 11, 2011.

“It’s a living reminder of the price of freedom. Freedom is not free,” said Maj. Gen. Francis Hazard, a member of the Urbana Rotary Club, in 2011 when the beam arrived in Urbana.