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Appointed senator to face election challenges in Warren County


Ohio Senator Steve Wilson should have opposition in his run for the District 7 seat to which he was appointed little more than a year ago.

RELATED: Retired banker new senator in Warren County

Brad Lamoreaux of Lebanon has filed to run against Wilson, R-Hamilton Twp., in the May Republican primary. Democrat Sara Bitter of Loveland also filed on Monday and would face Wilson or Lamoreaux in November, according to an on-line list of candidates posted by the Warren County Board of Elections.

Wilson replaced Shannon Jones, who was elected to the Warren County Board of Commissioners as she faced her term limit in the Ohio Senate.

Former Springboro Board of Education President Kelly Kohls, who unsuccessfully challenged Jones’ reelection to the state senate in 2014, had not returned her petitions to join the race by 1 p.m. Tuesday.

RELATED: Senate race tests tea party influence

The winners of the Republican primary usually win general election in Warren County.

Another May primary race pits former State Rep. Ron Maag against County Commissioner Tom Grossmann.

RELATED: GOP leaders in primary election race in Warren County

State Rep. Scott Lipps, R-Franklin, also looks to face primary opposition. Daniel Kroger of Clearcreek Twp. has filed to oppose Lipps in the Republican primary.

RELATED: 3-way GOP race a test of tea party influence in Warren County

State Rep. Paul Zeltwanger, R-Mason, filed Monday and so far looks to be unopposed in the May primary. However Nikki Foster of Mason is filed to run against him in November for the 54th District seat. Foster is unopposed in the Democratic primary.

The filing deadline is 4 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 7. The primary is May 8.



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