Ohio House votes to require photos on food stamp cards

Ohio Auditor Dave Yost says legislation would cut down on fraud.


Update Nov. 2: The Ohio House voted Wednesday to require photos be added to food stamp cards in Ohio. The bill now heads to the Ohio Senate. 

The bill passed 61-30.

Earlier story: Ohio Auditor Dave Yost wants to put people’s photos on their food stamp cards.

Yost, a Republican and oft-mentioned candidate for attorney general next years, announced the proposed legislation Wednesday as a means for preventing fraud in the $2.5 billion program.

RELATED: Dead people got food stamps in Ohio

At a Statehouse news conference Yost said fraud accounts for millions of dollars in the program, formally known as Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).

The move is a common sense step that will cost taxpayers money, Yost acknowledged. Still, he called it a good investment to protect the integrity of the program.

“It’s a no-brainer,” said Yost.

RELATED: Auditor grilled over food stamp probe

Exceptions will allow some food stamp users to bypass the photo requirement, based on religious beliefs.

An advocate for food stamp users, Lisa Hamlet-Fugitt, director of the Ohio Association of Food Banks, said she is hoping the photo requirement does not have a chilling effect on people who need the benefits.

A pair of bills to implement the photo requirement, which is allowed by federal law, will be introduced in the Ohio House and Senate.



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