NEW INFO:

Dayton woman killed by stray bullet ‘was my everything,’ son says

State considers punishing cities that use traffic, red-light cameras


State lawmakers are holding hearings today on a bill that would cut state funding to cities using speed and red-light cameras.

House Bill 410, sponsored by Cincinnati Republican Rep. Bill Seitz and Oakwood Rep. Jim Butler, would require cities to file all traffic camera cases in municipal court and would reduce state funding to cities by the same amount cities collect in traffic camera revenue.

The House Government and Accountability Committee is set to have its third hearing on the bill today.

Seitz authored an anti-traffic camera law that the Ohio Supreme Court struck down as unconstitutional.

Related: Cities can turn red light cameras back on, court rules; state threatens to fight back

They have to pay the filing fee, bring in a lawyer and prove their case in court.

“No more administrative hearings where some employee of the city sits there and the poor motorist has to, in effect, prove his innocence in order to be acquitted of the civil citation,” Seitz said.

Under Seitz’ bill, the state will cut Local Government Fund money flowing to cities that use traffic enforcement cameras.

Small town could have to pay millions

New Miami speeders who are owed more than $3 million in unconstitutional fines are one step closer to collecting, following a 12th District Court of Appeals ruling.

The court has ruled this week that New Miami is not entitled immunity because the village gained funds by collecting fines under the old speed camera program, which has been declared unconstitutional.

RELATED: New Miami loses decision on speed cameras

Not first try

Previously, Seitz pushed through a law that required cities using traffic cameras to station a full-time police officer with each camera in use; conduct a three-year traffic study before deploying a camera; give speeders a “leeway” before issuing tickets.

Related: Cities fear rise in accidents if traffic camera use ends

Dayton challenged the 2015 law in court.

In a 5-2 decision issued in July, the Ohio Supreme Court ruled that that law conflicts with cities’ home-rule authority. The Ohio Constitution gives municipalities self-governance powers as long as local ordinances don’t conflict with the state’s general laws.

Related: Dayton to activate red light cameras again

At the time of the supreme court ruling, Seitz promised that lawmakers would consider new legislation requiring cities go through municipal courts instead of an administrative process for tickets issued via traffic camera enforcement programs.

Seitz, who received a ticket when a camera caught him rolling through a right turn at a red light in Columbus, noted that lawmakers approved restrictions on photo enforcement cameras in 2006 and 2014 and voters in Cincinnati and Cleveland overwhelmingly approved limits or bans.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Politics

Local Congressman Jim Jordan could become one of most powerful D.C. players
Local Congressman Jim Jordan could become one of most powerful D.C. players

With the 2018 midterm elections months away, experts are eyeing two scenarios for House Republicans: One: they lose the House majority. Two: They keep the majority, but it shrinks. For U.S. Rep. Jim Jordan, the first scenario is a nightmare. The second could make him one of the most powerful people in Washington. Jordan, who saw his two endorsed GOP...
Big money, political muscle on display in payday lending clash
Big money, political muscle on display in payday lending clash

Payday lending stores dot the landscape of Ohio’s small towns, suburban strip malls and inner-city thoroughfares. To hear one side tell it, they give their customers — many with bad credit — much-needed access to quick money for emergencies and everyday expenses. To hear the other side tell it, they take advantage of the poor by charging...
Brown takes shot at Renacci in negative ad
Brown takes shot at Renacci in negative ad

THE AD: A 30-second television commercial for Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio. WHERE TO SEE IT: State broadcast television and here  VIDEO: Unflattering images of Renacci. Then it concludes with Sherrod Brown chatting with industrial workers. SCRIPT: Voice of a narrator: The U.S. Congress. There’s 68 teachers, 15 farmers, four pilots, but...
Should people work for Medicaid? Here’s how to weigh in.
Should people work for Medicaid? Here’s how to weigh in.

The clock has started for the next round of public comment on Ohio’s proposal to create the state’s first ever work requirements associated with Medicaid. The new rules would add requirements to work or go to school at least 20 hours per week to remain eligible for benefits under the health insurance program for low-income Ohioans, which...
Kushner tower, drowning in debt, gets lifeline with ties to Qatar
Kushner tower, drowning in debt, gets lifeline with ties to Qatar

The company controlled by the family of White House adviser Jared Kushner is close to receiving a bailout of its troubled flagship building by a company with financial ties to the government of Qatar, according to executives briefed on the deal.  Charles Kushner, head of the Kushner Cos., is in advanced talks with Brookfield Asset Management over...
More Stories